“A wise old owl lived in an oak;
The more he saw the less he spoke;
The less he spoke the more he heard...
Why can't we all be like that bird?”
― Edward Hersey Richards




my POETRY | ANNI'S BOOK CRITIQUES | my ART | my BIRD photography | MLB | NFL | hurricanes






Independence Trail [Part III]

The reason behind our day trip to Victoria and areas nearby was to find and walk the battleground which was a pivotal part of the Texas Revolution. I have read and am reading novels on the subject, and I told Bud one day we should go up north and see the area first hand. Of course the landscaping has changed considerably from the early 1800s, but all in all, a person can still get a live picture conjured up after seeing the area in real time. Two particular areas I've recently read about are many mentions of James Walker Fannin's surrender near Coleto Creek. and the massacre of his 300 plus troops near Goliad, Texas.1 I wanted to see for myself.  This area we visited on March 2nd [Texas Independence Day], was a near-ghost-town of Fannin, Texas.  Coleto Creek area also has some history connected.  Fannin Texas, at the time open prairie, was on the Coleto Creek [today it's been dammed and there is now a Coleto Creek Reservoir and Campground].  A battle took place here on March 19th and March 20th, instigating a surrender of Colonel Fannin and his men.  They were marched to Goliad Texas by Santa Ana's army and executed.  After walking the battleground in 2017 it was an 'awakening'  experience.  Some exhibits and a monument stand in memory of surrender and of the massacre...


Battleground Entrance


Exhibit A


Pictograph [Colonel Fannin, injured in Blue]


Mexican Soldier & Monument
[exhibit house & pavilion in background]


One of a Few Copper exhibits showing battle weapons, etc.


The Battleground seen from Exhibit House


An Historical Synopsis in Exhibit House


One of the Few who survived the Goliad Massacre


Texians Armed at Coleto Creek Battle
["Texians" is not a typo...-...definition HERE]


Etched at the San Jacinto Monument in Houston


The Texas Flag of Today!





1 [besides the Alamo in San Antonio, Washington on the Brazos [part I, II and III] where the declaration of Independence was drafted, signed, and ratified, to the last, winning battle for Texas's Independence - San Jacinto Battle near Houston which we visited years ago before becoming Texas citizens ourselves]


DAY TRIP - part one
DAY TRIP - part two

14 comments :

  1. I didn't know any of this! These memorials are a fitting tribute, and beautifully done!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Ginny. Hope you enjoyed reading about it.

      Delete
  2. How interesting! I am lifelong Texan and I've never been to any of the historic battlegrounds. Shame on me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. well, yes...shame on you. But, there is a plus side to you not going...you LIVED in Texas so the history is probably well known for you, where I have to learn it, new, as I grow older. lol

      Delete
  3. Very interesting history lesson. I wouldn't mind visiting this place. Way back when I was about 7 my family was on a trip to Mexico and we stopped in Texas to visit the Alamo. I don't remember going to any other historical sites though

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For me, the Alamo was a disappointment in so many ways...first off and foremost, it was "TOO" commercial.

      Thanks Ann

      Delete
  4. I have visited many historical sights in GA and in FL and a few in KY but none in Texas, since I love all things Western, this is a place I would like to visit. did you notice in the photo of the trees looking out over all that green beauty, the trees appear to be holding hands.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, I didn't. Not 'til you pointed it out! What a great eye you have for detail.

      Delete
  5. So so important to see and understand this history; not only important to Texas but to the US. Great post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Besides, it helps in doing further reading, be they novels or OTHER non-fiction. Thanks Marie.

      Delete
  6. History is sometimes boring and sometimes exciting. This was very educational and I loved reading all of it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There is so much Texas history, different countries that it was before being part of the US...it continues to fascinate me. Glad you enjoyed this little bit on my 'home' state.

      Delete
  7. You have so any interesting things to see near you. I enjoyed this!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks...I'm happy to know you enjoyed it Mari.

      Delete

.