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Washington on the Brazos - Part I

With the recent past 'talks' of all the states rallying to petition to secede from the United States, we became interested in learning more of the history of the Republic of Texas. Now, just my opinion, but I think only one state in the union could actually succeed in becoming its own country once again, and that is Texas. Texas is a rich state, and about the only one in all 50 states that has been keeping their state's budget in the black...no deficits in other words. Of course, we realize that becoming an independent Republic again would be, to say the least, not too smart -with the world's economy- just think, the import tax alone would be exorbitant for the newly formed Republic of Texas as a country in the 21st century; a country of Texas?  Possible but improbable, right? Okay...'nough politicking!! Anyway, we three wanted to drive up and see the historical area in the Hill Country of Texas...to see where Texas became a Republic. An independent country...BEFORE it joined the union as the 28th state in America. Washington on the Brazos is where the composing and signing of the Declaration of Indpendence of R. O. T. came about. Here are some photos of the area....



...all images can be enlarged for better viewing




LEFT: Crossing the Brazos River RIGHT: Entry to Washington on the Brazos


LEFT: Ferry Crossing at the Brazos [scenic view] ---Taking travelers into the town of Washington, Texas RIGHT: Texans used various types of ferries during the 19th century. Robinson's operation probably took advantage of the river's current to take the flat boat from one side of the river to the other.

LEFT: Crossing the Brazos River below its confluence with the Navasota [another nearby river] gave travelers the advantage of fording one river instead of two. On the well-traveled La Bahia Road, this was a natural spot for a ferry. RIGHT: at one point in history, the war with the Mexicans threatened the residents...and flee they did...many used a 'runaway scape'--- TEXANS fled Santa Anna's armies in fear during March of 1836. Their panicked retreat, called the Runaway Scape, was slowed at crossings on rivers, like the Brazos. Delegates and townspeople also quickly abandoned Washington after the convention. Santa Anna's troops passed to the south, however, and did not come into the deserted town.


ON THIS GROUND TEXAS CREATED A NEW NATION, founded in liberty and self-determination. Dissatisfied with the Mexican government after Santa Anna declared himself dictator, the Texas army began fighting Mexican forces in September 1835. When the Convention met here in 1836, most Texans supported independence from Mexico and the formation of a new Republic.


INDEPENDENCE HALL - Washington on the Brazos - Washington, Texas 1836. Within these walls, the Republic of Texas was formed.

Monument dedicated to the independence of the Republic of Texas... "On this spot, was made the Independence of Texas, March 2, 1836."





Also, along with the historical aspect of this now state park/historical area - I enjoyed the scenery!!! The oak trees [not the evergreen live oak- but the red oak], the pine trees, the black walnut with the golden foliage...the ash, the orange trees and the rustle of leaves falling along the pathways...on a cool brisk autumn day, it was enchanting!!



...more to follow with Part II of Washington on the Brazos in an upcoming post; soon.

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25 comments:

  1. I didn't know this about Texas. It's a huge area and I can see how it could be come its own country, but I hope it doesn't. I would have to carry my passport to visit family. :-)

    I just read your soapbox over on the sidebar and was fascinated by these thoughts. Thank you!

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  2. So glad you shared.

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  3. What a lovely series of shots.

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  4. Texas is as large as most of Western Europe...

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  5. Love learning history about other places. Very cool!

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  6. I actually knew this about TX. My hubby looked it up a few years ago. I think you guys could pull it off, though. You have sea ports and the ability to import/export if necessary. We love history and I have enjoyed your historic journey very much! Someday I want to visit TX!!!

    I love the layout!!! Very nice!

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  7. Very interesting, Anni! I will look forward to reading Part 2. Thanks for visiting me again...funny that we both have pets named Winnie.

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  8. Yep, they've been talking this kind of talk ever since I was born there ages and ages ago. Who knows, maybe they'll actually do it some day!! Great post and terrific captures for the day, Anni, as always!! Hope you have a lovely weekend!!

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  9. Anni I think you might have been a historian in another life.
    Your posts on history around you are absolutely amazing...pictures and facts!!
    Happy Friday
    Hugs Madi and Mom

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  10. Anni,what great history facts about TX. I did not know this and it was interesting and your photos were awesome.
    I can not wait to read more about your great state.
    Hugs

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  11. Very interesting to learn the history. I think it probably could be on it's own. All 50 states tried to petition out! lol sandie

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  12. Beautiful, historic scenery.

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  13. We raised our kids in Dallas, and they were very disappointed when we retired to New Mexico. "Where will we stay when we go back for High School reunions?" Nice history lesson and a reminder about our governance.

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  14. I love historical things. You got some really pretty pictures!
    I loved what you had to say in your soapbox on the sidebar too. Preach it!

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  15. I enjoyed this short walk in Texas history, and am intrigued by the idea of states leaving the US. My state is California and is run by spend thrifts so that wouldn't do us any good. Texas seems on a better path financially.

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  16. It has been years since I've been to Washington on the Brazos. It hasn't lost any of its beauty.

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  17. Interesting history lesson, I look forward to hearing more about it.

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  18. Love the red leaves you captured.


    My Skywatch post

    Have a great weekend.

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  19. A thought provoking post Anni. Enjoyed it all,

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  20. I just came from a blog where I had to contend with word verification, so I am blessing you for turning yours off!

    Thanks for all your wonderful shadowy photos!

    Mary of the Shadows

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  21. Strange rumblings rising in Texas as described here! Fascinating history! And loved the detail of the photos!

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  22. good to learn something new everyday anni!!!

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  23. I hink that we tend to forget the modest beginnings and buildings at the beginning of a republic. The view of Brazos looks modest - yet in that independence hall, the thinkers were not modest in their goals, but audacious enough to form that republic...I hope that Texas would stay in the USA as the rest of us (like myself in the more govt. intrusive state of CT) need to see a land where independence seems to be more the rule like TX...like the ad tagline, it's like a whole 'nother country

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  24. Coming back for Shadow Shot.

    My Shadow
    Have a blessed Sunday!

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  25. Great history review of Texan history! Love the fall pictures.

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