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Goliad Texas - The 2nd Alamo

GOLIAD [pronounced GO lee add]
BAHIA [pronounced bah EE ah in Spanish, meaning BAY]





Texas Flag History
"I would rather cut off my right arm, than live under tyranny"

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While Erik was visiting during his teaching holiday break, we took him to Goliad, Texas. This little town is known in Texas Lore as the "Second Alamo". The area is only part of the Texas Independence Trail.  Here, on October 9, 1835, in the early days of the Texas Revolution, a group of Texans* attacked the presidio in the Battle of Goliad. The Mexican garrison quickly surrendered, leaving the Texans in control of the fort. The first declaration of independence of the Republic of Texas was signed here on December 20, 1835

In obedience to Santa Anna's orders [the 8th president of Old Mexico], on this day in 1836 [March 27th] Urrea [Santa Anna's chief lieutenant] ordered his men to open fire on Fannin and his soldiers, along with about 100 other captured Texans. More than 400 men were executed that day at Goliad. The Goliad Massacre, set in the town of Goliad, was the killing of Republic of Texas prisoners of war and their commander, James Fannin, during the Texas Revolution by the Mexican Army.  Words echoed through the area:  "Remember Goliad" as were stated about the Alamo!  Texas, under Samuel Houston finally won their independence just less than a short month later, at San Jacinto. The decisive battle would earn Texas its independence.  Houston  concluded his impassioned speech with the rallying cry: “Remember the Alamo! The Alamo! The Alamo!” His men thundered a reply with an addendum: “Remember the Alamo! Remember Goliad!”

Within the town of Goliad, there is a state park, a mission, and an historic courthouse to entice history buffs...

The State Historical Park was our first stop:

Fannin Memorial:

[the curator of the museum stated the canon at the Fannin Memorial is an original from the fort's grounds]

Next stop: Goliad's La Bahia Presidio [originally founded in the early 1700s]

Note: The church [as seen in these photos/with the crosses] within the compound is still in use for Sunday Services!!!

From the many gun turrets of the fort walls, the view of the surrounding area is vast and open. From the tree tops you can see the Mission and the historic courthouse spires, which we also visited. Photos of the mission and a stop at the courthouse photos will be in an upcoming post...







Read More: GOLIAD's Declaration of Independence
State Historical Battleground [Fannin]
Photos/Map of Fannin Battleground
The Goliad Massacre 
La Bahia

PLEASE NOTE: Santa Anna's image courtesy of Google Images search
* Texans were referred to, as Texians

30 comments :

  1. I never heard of Goliad before, but of course the Alamo is known to many, including me. Interesting post, Anni. Thanks for educating me! :-)

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    1. It's just a small town, most people haven't heard of the area.

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  2. Very interesting post, thanks for sharing it and the photos are wonderful to view!

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  3. Good history lesson. I have a niece who lives in Goliad.

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    1. I like the area, very much. It's been a few years since we've been up that way, so it was a nice drive.

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  4. I am impressed with that church and ever more so that it is still used for services.

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    1. Yes, and the bell was ringing each 15 minutes... it IS impressive.

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  5. Wow, how amazing! I had no idea about any of this! That flag does look like the Russian flag, with the hammer and sickle. I love the angel photos. Oh my, this CHURCH!!! How I would love to just enter and breathe the history! Is it Catholic? So awesome they still hold services. I wonder what the membership is? I love how you change your headers so often!! Your fancy bird is so pretty!

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    1. Being part of the presidio, I'm sure it's Catholic.

      Thanks so much for the header compliment Ginny.

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  6. We went there -- so many great historical sites in Texas.... your pictures and narration bring it all back. I'm sure your son really enjoyed thiz.

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    1. I got a 503 message trying to have your blog load...will try to visit again later Sallie.

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  7. Ohhh you, B and Erik had a fine visit and saw more very interesting sites in Texas.
    Happy New Year
    Hugs madi and mom

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    1. HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU TWO TOO, M&M

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  8. What an interesting place. Pretty awesome that the church is still being used

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  9. Fascinating - I've never heard of this history before. But there's a lot of history like that, I missed various aspects of history teaching by moving around when I grew up.

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    1. I really didn't like history when in school...but as I age, it has become much more important/interesting. Thanks Al.

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  10. I never heard of Goliad, but would love to visit it. I love old buildings and history!

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    1. Considering the 'age' of USA, this is definitely old in comparing other historical places I guess. 1700s? And 'out west'? Yep. It's a good place to stop by if you're ever in South Texas.

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  11. Wow, I did not know this story. Not much mercy there!

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    1. Definitely no mercy, that's for sure.

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  12. Interesting tour of the park.

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  13. Nice to know that history surrounds us, if only we would learn from it.

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    Replies
    1. "They" say...history repeats itself.

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  14. So much history, so much violence, so much death, all too much for me to understand. It hurts my heart but is interesting at the same time.

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    1. Indeed...history is full of violence.

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  15. Ah, very cool. Texans are very proud of their history. What a bloody bunch of battles it was between not very many people for not very long for a huge tract of land.

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    1. Yep....and all so much pride in this land!!!

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