“A wise old owl lived in an oak;
The more he saw the less he spoke;
The less he spoke the more he heard...
Why can't we all be like that bird?”
― Edward Hersey Richards




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Blue Skies....Smilin' at Me!!

Tuesday....the sky was clear, deep blue...the air was MUCH fresher...the rains have passed. For now. I was out walking first thing in the morning along the river and through the park! I was no longer a shut-in case of 'what is there to do indoors'?!! AKA - a happy camper!!



FARLEY BOAT
All around the fishing village, Port Aransas, as you walk/drive the streets, you may take notice of the smaller, scaled down replicas of the "Farley Boats". Some are made into planters, others decorated with a sea theme...but all have an eye catching look about them tho all very diverse. The Farley Boat is/was in fact part of Port A's history since the early 1900s. They were built by the Farley Brothers...a tarpon boat built for fishing in the Gulf of Mexico's bay waters.  Of course, with me driving around this area of the south Texas Coast, I rarely pay much attention to them any more, but when I first noticed them years ago, I was intrigued by them and wondered the reason so many could be seen in and around the area....until I read about them online...

an excerpt from Wikipedia:
    In 1936, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt visited Port Aransas and was introduced to tarpon fishing. He enjoyed tarpon fishing so much that in 1937, while Congress was debating his Judiciary Reorganization Bill of 1937, he traveled to Port Aransas specifically to catch tarpon. He hired Barney Farley, the famous fishing guide and brother of Fred Farley.  The president brought his own 35-foot fishing boat and Barney Farley agreed to take the President out on the boat. After an unsuccessful outing, Barney Farley convinced the president to fish from a Farley Boat. The President caught so many tarpon that he returned to Port Aransas later that year to again fish with Barney Farley on a Farley Boat.




Read about the beginnings and history of the Farley Boats here.
Wikipedia Article


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SHIPS passing in the NIGHT or DAY
Corpus Christi is, for the most part a Port City...meaning importing and exporting cargo by ship. Most times, when I photograph the large cargo/tanker ships, it's usually at Port Aransas entering the ship channel from the Gulf of Mexico.  For instance, this post.   Well, there are actually three separate channels...the Lydia Ann channel, the Aransas Channel and the Corpus Christi channel...comprising a 20 mile stretch of waterways...all connecting the Gulf with the 8th largest port in America...the port of Corpus Christi. The channels are 45 feet deep. Instead of showing the ships entering or leaving as I normally do, I thought I'd catch an inbound tanker coming IN TO the port of Corpus Christi, sailing UNDER the Harbor Bridge in a series. Keep your eye on the  Blue and Yellow Smoke Stack...

[1]Tanker in Corpus Christi Bay.........[2]Ship nearing the port entry passage [small boat at the tanker's bow is the guiding tug boat]


[3]Passing the WWII Museum [USS Lexington] ......[4]Just feet away from the bridge-buildings in foreground are restaurants, gift shops and Texas Aquarium


Smoke stacks seen passing under Harbor Bridge [a 6 lane highway connecting the city of Corpus Christi with Rincon Bay -to locals it's known as North Beach] entering the Port and Port authority..  And of course, ships are both domestic AND foreign.


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BEACH

Oftentimes I see the very tiny 'butterfly clam shells'. I usually stop and check them out because of the many many colors and swirls in the shells' patterns. The interior of the shells are just as pretty if not more so. The inside can range from a pearly off white to pink, purple and sometimes an ocean blue.



Growing up, landlocked in the foothills of Colorado, I never witnessed this 'til one year we vacationed along the Gulf Coast.  I had forgotten about it until we relocated here after retiring.  I remember the first time I saw this activity years ago. And I wondered just what the heck these guys were doing. Finally the curiosity got the better of me and I had to ask one gentleman. He was happy to explain it all to me. He was plunging for fish bait close to shore. I never asked just how they know where to do the plunging, but they do! 99% of the time they come up with a glob of wet sand...and bait! For the most part, the bait is then carried to a bucket filled with Gulf water to keep the bait alive. The bait? They're called GHOST SHRIMP. And the pumps are inexpensive and he told me they can easily be 'homemade' too.  A few weeks ago, I happened to 'catch' sight of the activity once again and asked permission to take a couple of photos...


Plunging for Ghost Shrimp - Ghost Shrimp Pump


Ghost Shrimp

28 comments :

  1. My deceased husband, brother-in-law, and nephew used to love to go floundering down there. Not sure exactly where, but they would talk about when a big ship would go by and cause the waves.

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    1. Ya, along the channel the ship wakes can be a bit dangerous.

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  2. I've never seen or heard of ghost shrimp. How fascinating. The other thing that amazes me is how clean the sand looks It's been a while since I've been to the beach but I don't remember the sand on our beaches here looking that clean

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    1. Well....actually it depends on the area of beach. Most areas are pretty well filled with seaweed, shells, and trash being washed ashore. You have to realize that the photos above are just a few INCHES of sand, and not the entire beach!!!

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  3. Neat! I just learned something, since I too had never heard of ghost shrimp. Can I take my eye off the blue and yellow smoke stack now, Anni? :-)

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  4. the ghost shrimp is news to me and have not seen them or heard of them. the little shells are coquinas, we have zillions of them here, and the name of the beach is Coquina Beach. is they are picked up before they open, they make soup from them. just rinse and boil and they pop open leaving the little pieces in the soup. I like to watch the live ones digging themselves in when the waves come in. and the shells are beautiful.

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  5. Sandra is right on! She has described the Little Coquina and Variable Coquina perfectly. I have even made the soup! We have crafted projects with them being the "butterflies" in flower art. The Ghost Shrimp, Callichirus major are found in NC and SC as well. I sure miss my beach days when I found and identified everything I picked up.

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  6. I have seen these Ghost Shrimp on T.V. nature documentaries, too. They are sure iccky, and no one would want to eat then except fish. You live in the most gorgeous, interesting, and exciting place. I love the story of the Farley Boat and the president. I wonder what makes the difference...maybe they are quieter or in some way they do not alert the fish like other boats. I love the cute miniature, and it even has a fisher inside! I have a collection of shells, but have never seen double ones like these butterflies.

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    1. ...most times you only see 1/2 the shell. It's something I look for when I walk the shores...a 'whole' butterfly.

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  7. Fascinating!!! It has been so many years since I have been to Port Aransas. Louis Dean and I made a trip to Corpus Christi back in 2009. I love seeing the sea,sand,surf + all the birds and nature you show us here on your blog. It's wonderful ya'll retired to a place you really enjoy. I dreamed of retiring to Colorado but that's obviously never going to happen! Do you go back to visit there often?

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    1. Why would anyone want to retire in Colorado....it's not bad in the hot summer days [and the mountains] but winters? No way. lol

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  8. I have read your blog with great joy. Learned new things. never heard about Ghost Shrimp and Ghost Shrimp Pumps.

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    1. Thanks for visiting today Jedidja

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  9. Very interesting about the ghost shrimp. I enjoyed your pretty photos so much. It's been so very long since I've visited the beach.

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    1. Seems to me the week long spring break and student riots, etc. on the beach..well, it seems very long since I've been there too. LOL....I stay away from it all during Spring Break.

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  10. I never knew about plunging for bait like that. Pretty interesting!

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    1. Odd habit I think...but a fisherman has gotta do what a fisherman needs to do.

      lol

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  11. I never heard of ghost shrimp or plunging for bait. Very interesting!

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    1. Thanks Mari...glad you stopped by.

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  12. From the massive size of the ship to the small butterfly shells, all are lovely.

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  13. Wonderful pics.. Quite some bridge...

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  14. Interesting post..I would love to watch the ships and boats and tankers come and go.

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