“A wise old owl lived in an oak;
The more he saw the less he spoke;
The less he spoke the more he heard...
Why can't we all be like that bird?”
― Edward Hersey Richards




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Bits and Pieces from Mardi Gras to Texas Independence...

1- For the first time in my life on "Fat Tuesday" [aka Mardi Gras], I bought a King's Cake which is a New Orleans tradition for celebrating. The cake itself is supposedly originating in France and the idea came to America circa the 1870s. To me, it was like a frosted/heavily sugared croissant! Rich and heavy. I couldn't finish my piece. Since I've been trying to cut down on sugar intake, I tried scraping off the frosting and eat it without...nope, still way too sweet. It laid on my stomach late into the evening. Okay...that was the first and most likely the LAST King's Cake in our house. With his sweet tooth, Bud enjoyed it a lot. lol By the way, I got the 'baby' in my slice. That too means something. Good luck and fortune coming my way? Nope...tradition tells me I must host the next Mardi Gras party. Probably not. The vivid colors of Mardi Gras, purple, yellow and green represent some significance also: Yellow [or gold] is POWER, green is FAITH, and purple signifies JUSTICE. And, to write even further of the legend, the colors were chosen by the gifts of the wise men who visited the Christ Child on the Epiphany. Mardi Gras Day has a moveable date and may occur on any Tuesday from February 3rd to March 9th. It is always the day before Ash Wednesday, and always falls 46 days before Easter. I'll skip the traditional cake, but give me a trip to New Orleans and I'll take it!!

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2- Then, on March 2nd, it would be Texas Independence Day! I have finished the book Surrender and Infamy...a novel about the Goliad, Texas massacre by Santa Ana's troops. As I said previously, the book was VERY GOOD. And since it's historically 'the month' in Texas History, I am now reading another novel on the same subject. This time a highly acclaimed, with numerously given accolades to be one of the best ever written in novel form; with extreme accuracy in the events that proceeded the Battle of San Jacinto [near Houston Texas] which gave Texas its independence from Mexico and Santa Ana's surrender. The book: THE BUGLES ARE SILENT. I've read 6 chapters so far, and I think I'll stick with it throughout. I'm enjoying the difference in perspectives from the two authors on the same subjects and persons in the state's past. I've become more inclined to take a side trip to Fannin and Coleto Creek between Goliad and Victoria Texas to see for myself the area where the capture and surrender of Fannin's men took place, and were then escorted to Goliad and SHOT execution style. Then...the revenge of the loss of the Alamo [we've been there], and the surrender of Santa Ana at the Battle of San Jacinto [we've been there]. Texas is rich in history of a whole different kind.

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3- Speaking of Texas. Y'all know I'm a native born child of Nebraska, growing up and raising a family in Colorado...then retiring to Texas. The saying goes, "I wasn't born in Texas, but I got here as quickly as I could". Well, I have to be honest, I buy my groceries at the locally established H E B grocery chain that is found, for the most part, throughout the state. It originated in Kerrville, Texas and I shop here at H E B's several times a month. Funny part is, I have walked past this entry way to the garden shop MANY times, and have never noticed this before. See the "We Have Texas Roots"? Well, duh, Anni...clever play on words for an in-store plant shop, don't you think? It could be the 'roots' of the sold plants, OR the 'roots' being that it was established here in the Hill Country of Texas.  Trust me, it was a BLOND moment...well at least blond ROOTS...



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4- Another subject on Texas...and that is Texan pronunciation. Remember, in Texas it's a whole 'nother world. For instance a few that continue to boggle my mind. Amarillo [pronounced correctly in Spanish it should be Am-a-REE-oh], yet,  in this fine state, it's Am a RILL o. Another one is Refugio. In the Texas lingo it's pronounced Ra FEAR ee oh.   Bexar...in Texas it's BEAR. Armadillo [the animal] it's arm a DILL o. Another comes to mind, and that is Mexia, Texas. The local town residents pronounce it Muh HAIR Texas. The town's motto is: "A great place, no matter how you pronounce it." Which brings me to this. A joke:

Two foreigners visiting Mexia Texas couldn't agree on how to say the town's name.
They pulled into a Dairy Queen and one said to the clerk:
"We're not from here and we can't agree on pronunciation."
"Can you tell us where we are?"

The clerk smiles and says slowly to help the foreigners...

"You're at DARE EE KWEEN."

I ♥ Mexia, Texas sign courtesy of Google Images


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5- The mini-series, Texas Rising, starred Bill Paxton as General Samuel Houston. Mr. Paxton died this past week at the age of 61 due to complications of surgery. In reading articles online about his acting career and family, I understand that Paxton was distantly related to General Houston. Excerpt from Bill Paxton's interview: "Sam Houston and I share common grandparents going back six generations. His mother would be a great-aunt of mine. That makes Sam Houston and me second cousins four times removed. My dad was always a huge fan of Sam Houston from the book "The Raven," that won the Pulitzer in 1930, by Marquis James. I'm first-generation Texan."

photo courtesy of Google Search and History Channel

28 comments :

  1. A wonderful and informative post, Anni. I enjoyed every bit, and I'm glad it was YOU and not me who ate that King cake. It sounds incredibly rich and sweet. :-)

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    1. Thanks....I won't eat any more of it for sure.

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  2. I've never been tempted by the King cake...so sorry it did not agree with you but glad Bud enjoyed it. Thank you for sharing about the books you are reading. I love the Dairy Queen joke....having grown up in Georgia, I know all about an accent! lol Cute name for the garden center. Very sad about Mr. Paxton passing away.
    I hope you will enjoy your day. xoxo Mildred

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    1. You and me both, the king cake I guess isn't for everyone I've learned.

      Thanks Mildred, and enjoy your weekend.

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  3. What an interesting post about Texas. The King Cake looks mighty rich!

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    1. Rich is was indeed. And, thanks Jo. By the way, happy Anniversary you two.

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  4. You said it like it is. Never lived anywhere but Texas and am here until my number comes up.

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    1. I love the fact that you're a Texas native!! I truly love the state...everything about it.

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  5. I love the joke! I have never had a King Cake, and now want to try one! I think I will buy one! If there are any left. Those babies are dangerous if you ask me! Who knows how many people have choked on them! They are so tiny! Well, I guess everyone knows about them and are careful. Wish I could visit a HEB. I didn't know you are not a Texas native! Did you know there is a song by Peter Gabriel called "San Jacinto"? I will look it up on You Tube and send you the link.

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    1. Wasn't that a funny story?!! Glad you enjoyed it. Did you find a king cake to try?

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  6. Here is the link for San Jacinto https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1IxE6z1tjo

    Forgot to say I love your fierce header!

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    1. Thanks for the link, and thanks for the header compliment.

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  7. I enjoyed Texas Rising but had forgotten he was in it.. sad to die so young. that white tailed hawk in your header is AWESOME. love the feathers... I am off sugar, but if I were not there is nothing to sweet for me that I can't eat the whole thing. that is why I am fat.. sweets are my addiction and a trigger food that sets me off. I am ROFL at the Dairy Queen, I love it!!!

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    1. I have the same thing when it comes to some sweet stuffs....like Rice Krispies...way too sugary, but oh so good.

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  8. Oh, I loved this post! I do love Texas and all the history! I'm like Sandra - I watched it but had forgotten that Bill Paxton was in it!
    I love that Dairy Queen joke!!!!
    We were recently in San Antonio on our sibling trip and it was my brother's first time to see The Alamo. It was a moving experience for all of us!

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    1. The Alamo, tho very much part of Texas Independence, the more or less commercialism/park atmosphere of the mission today is a bit disheartening to me. Thanks Linda.

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  9. I've never tried a King Cake but I have enjoyed few trips to New Orleans ;)

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    1. Oh me too....I do so enjoy the ambiance of New Orleans!!

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  10. Very entertaining post and I like the way your write it. I don't think I would eat the King cake not because of its colour but because it is too sweet for my liking. As a foreigner if I do go to Texas, I would be lost too when it comes to pronunciation.

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    1. Oh trust me, it's not just people that visit from other countries or even parts of the USA...even Texans can mispronounce names around here.

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  11. I don't think I could eat the King cake, sounds too sweet. My hubby has a serious sweet tooth and he would probably enjoy it. :)

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  12. Sweet is my middle name and I'd have NO problem eating the whole cake! This is an informative post and I've really enjoyed it, though not in a mood to read now.

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    1. I'm sure you can get the gist of it all without having to read the entire write up.

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  13. Oh--thank you for my first good laugh of the day. The DQ joke cracked me up...funny how sometimes something strikes a person as so funny. But I do need to send that one to my brother.

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    1. There are so many times in life when we need an outlet such as laughter! I'm glad the joke struck your funny bone!

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  14. I grew up in the mountain west and moved to Texas and lived there for years. I loved living in Texas and they indeed have a very distinguished history. I love how Texans take pride in their state. I'm an Okie now for a long time and I love Oklahoma but I still like Texas.

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    1. definitely a prideful state. Both in mind and country.

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