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Got a good reason For taking the easy way out


The Mythical Yellow Rose of Texas...

I share with you photos of the shadows of a couple of our yellow roses...of Texas, naturally.

It took me weeks to finish a novel entitled "Miss Emily The Yellow Rose of Texas"!! I was, at least at the beginning, struggling to enjoy the book. The beginning...ugh!! So many typos and so much, at least for me, incorrect use of the English language. For instance...the very first paragraph of the very first chapter had me saying to myself "Say What?"
    Sam Houston was not among the mourners at the gravesite. Rose swallowed the disappointment at not seeming him before her eyes found Emily bowed over her husband's coffin."
It just didn't make sense no matter how many times I tried re-reading. There were other points in the novel that made me stagger a bit. At least in the beginning. For me, if I were to be reading and editing, this section would stand out like a sore thumb in the context of it all!!! I puzzled over that for some time and then, moved on. But, after a few more chapters read, the book became a very good read. Was there really a Yellow Rose of Texas? Was her name indeed Emily? Being that there were actually, IN HISTORY, accounts of two women named Emily in the era of the great historical battles of The Alamo, and the Battle of San Jacinto. The characters in "Miss Emily The Yellow Rose of Texas" are based on true legends: Sam Houston, Stephen Austin, James Morgan, Emily [1] and her husband Lorenzo de Zavala, Emily [2] the free black/mulatto, Seguin, Crockett, Travis [and more]. Also Emily Rose. The legendary Yellow Rose of Texas. Being that the title "Yellow" meant [means] mulatto. And, of course, the Mexican dictator, Santa Anna [Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna]. With the song and myth behind the character, Rose of Texas, it has always conjured up the thrill of a mysterious woman, of mixed blood, being the legendary spy for Sam Houston. Did she really prostitute herself to Santa Anna in order for General Houston to acquire Texas from Mexico? Could it be that a woman actually assisted in 'winning' the battle of Independence of Texas? I like to think so; the romantic side of me shines at this point in time...it could be highly possible, not improbable I guess. It makes history much more, to not impugn Rose at all, a story like this just makes history much more 'colorful'.


Of course, me being me, when I finished reading this work of fiction, I had to get online and do some research. At least read more about the mythical, mystical legend in her time:


I found this online also. You see, in the novel, there is mention of a binding contract of one Emily West and a man named Morgan [oftentimes online, I find that Morgan is used as a surname for the female [mulatto], Emily Rose...aka Emily D. West, Emily Morgan]. This signature and contract is in the state's archives:


All in all, this is a good book. For me, if I finish reading an historical novel such as this, and I find myself doing more research; if it piques enough interest in me...it's worthy of print. This, tho the Emily, the Yellow Rose of Texas, is still purely legend, a mystery that went with all to their graves, will remain just that...a mystery. Several times I thought while reading this that it would make a good movie, or documentary, if done tastefully and accurately without Hollywood's influence.




In the book, the author has Rose's lover, Luke Sr, writing this poem.  She had an illegitimate son by him [Luke Jr] who Gen. Houston promised land to upon the success of Rose's seducing Santa Anna long enough for the Texas Army to invade and win the Battle of San Jacinto ....

There's a yellow rose in Texas, that I am going to see,
No other darky [sic] knows her, no darky only me
She cryed [sic] so when I left her it like to broke my heart,
And if I ever find her, we nevermore will part.

Chorus:

She's the sweetest rose of color this darky ever knew,
Her eyes are bright as diamonds, they sparkle like the dew;
You may talk about your Dearest May, and sing of Rosa Lee,
But the Yellow Rose of Texas is the only girl for me.

When the Rio Grande is flowing, the starry skies are bright,
She walks along the river in the quite [sic] summer night:
She thinks if I remember, when we parted long ago,
I promised to come back again, and not to leave her so.

Oh now I'm going to find her, for my heart is full of woe,
And we'll sing the songs togeather [sic], that we sung so long ago
We'll play the banjo gaily, and we'll sing the songs of yore,
And the Yellow Rose of Texas shall be mine forevermore.

37 comments :

  1. When I finally settle down, I'm going to plant a yard full of yellow roses. They were my grandma's favorite flower!

    Ruffling the Shadows

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    1. Yellow roses were my father's favorite flower too. He had many many different varieties.

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  2. Replies
    1. ...thanks Jim. Long time, no see!! How is one of my favorite Aussies?

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  3. It is hard for me to keep reading through all those typos. You stuck it out and it turned out to be worth it. I love roses of any color.

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  4. I've always wanted to believe the Yellow Rose of Texas was a real person. I'm glad that first book turned out better as it went on. I have a habit of not plowing into a book if I don't like the first chapter or two, so kudos to you for persevering.

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    1. ...my thoughts at first too...but I then told myself 'it can't get any worse'.

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  5. I would have put that book away forever after reading that first paragraph. I admire your persistence staying with the book. Don't authors hire editors anymore or are there any good editors left? I've found so many typos and hard to understand sentences since getting the kindle, and now the iPad. Poorly written books are a huge pet peeve of mine. The story of the Yellow Rose is very intriguing. I never really knew the history, so thank you for that!

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    1. I'm thinking the editor's hired use spell check...and 'seeming' isn't spelled incorrectly, so....no correction. It's sad.

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  6. Back a hundred years ago, when I was a very young, single woman, a friend and I were given a ski trip to Santa Fe from our boss.
    We stayed in a beautiful hotel there for a week. We ate our evening meal in the hotel dining room and the little band there played YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS each evening upon seeing us enter. It was sooo neat. :))

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    Replies
    1. I'm sure it was a thrill...and oh so fun.

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  7. Replies
    1. yellow roses are so pretty.

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  8. I have always loved yellow roses - and Texas, too. :)

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    Replies
    1. ...the two go together, right? LOL

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  9. I also cannot stand typos and grammatical errors when reading!

    I prefer any colour rose over red roses. I had a lovely yellow rose bush in our previous house that would bloom into December.

    For some reason I know all the words to Yellow Rose ofTexas since I was a kid...





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    1. ...it definitely throws the reader in a spin.

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  10. The poem is quite a bit different from the song I recall my dad teaching me when I was a kid.
    I've noticed a lot of typos in books that I've been reading lately. Some worse than others but it appears that editing isn't what it used to be

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    1. ...like I mentioned before, I think it's the use of spell check.

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  11. Anni you are a better reader than I am. I give a book 2 chapters...if it doesn't grab me back to the library it goes.
    Hugs C

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    Replies
    1. well it couldn't have been worse...so I prevailed and enjoyed the read to the end.

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  12. Really enjoyed this post. The song was one of my grandmother's favorites, but I've never thought about the Yellow Rose being a real person. Thanks for the information.

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    1. well, the 'character' is mythical, no one know for sure. but there are inclinations that she was a real person.

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  13. Pretty cool and informative post there Anni. Never really knew where the Yellow Rose came from. And you are right...that passage you quoted almost made my brain ache.

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    1. I know....my brain went into overdrive and burned up.

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  14. Wow, Anni! How interesting! For a native Texan, I didn't know!

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    1. ...it's all part of the Texas Lore/History

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  15. interesting read! yellow roses are bright and beautiful--i'd probably plant more yellow roses than red ones, if i have a rose garden.:p

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    Replies
    1. Yellow is such a beautiful, bright, warm color for any flower.

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  16. Awesome post. My favorite rose is yellow.

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    Replies
    1. ...it was my father's favorite rose too.

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  17. Beautiful and cheerful! Have a fabulous week!

    Liz (mlc)
    Liz (yacb)

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    Replies
    1. ...glad you enjoyed the post.

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  18. What an adorable and delicat yellow rose. You inspired me to plant my first yellow rose in my garden:) Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. ...that's great to know. I think you'll enjoy it for many years to come.

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  19. There is something like sunlight all wrapped up in the yellow rose! Always an intriguing one!

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    Replies
    1. I like your style in thinking Gemma.

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