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Got a good reason For taking the easy way out
Black and White Background courtesy of free backgrounds




Jock-a-mo...


IKO Iko!!!


Mardi Gras Indians have been parading in New Orleans at least since the mid-19th century, possibly before. The tradition was said to have originated from an affinity between Africans and Indians as minorities within the dominant culture, and blacks’ circumventing some of the worst racial segregation laws by representing themselves as Indians. According to some accounts, the tradition began as an African American tribute to American Indians who helped runaway slaves. These slaves married into the tribes on occasion. An appearance in town of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show in the 1880s was said to have drawn considerable attention and increased the interest in masking as Indians for Mardi Gras. In the late 19th century and early years of the 20th century, the tribes had a reputation for brawling with one another. This part of Mardi Gras Indian history is immortalized in James Sugar Boy Crawford’s song, “Jock O Mo” (better known and often cover versions as “Iko Iko”). As the 20th century progressed, physical confrontation gave way to assertions of status by having better suits, songs, and dances. Generations ago when Mardi Gras Indians came through neighborhoods, people used to run away; now people run toward them for the colorful spectacle. A tradition of male-only tribes ended in the late 20th-century as women began appearing in costume as well. Generally each “Indian” makes his own suit, assisted by family and friends to sew elaborate bead and feather work-a chief’s suit can weigh up to 150 pounds (68 kg) and cost up to U.S. $5,000-and traditionally a new suit is required each year.

Also, there is a stand of hierarchy with the tribes. From high...the chief down in rank.

The song "Iko Iko" which was made popular within the last half century, was written in 1953, according to this site.


Info courtesy of History Site
Picstory challenge:  vacation - photo taken on our trip to New Orleans, 2011. If you look closely, the tribal king in his garb; his face, can be seen between the two decorated faces - just below the white fur trim.





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32 comments :

  1. What an elaborate piece of work! Interesting history too - I did not know any of that!

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    1. ...looks very cumbersome and uncomfortable...not to mention "HOT" in the humidity of New Orleans. But still, all in all, a beautiful piece of work

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  2. i've often wondered where Mardi Gras came from, now, thanks to you, i am a little better informed. and i so want to still go... looks like the most amazing fun!

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    1. it has quite a history Shadow.

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  3. Wow! That is a really amazing headdress. I'm reading a book right now about the epic migration of blacks from the south to the north, and this fits right in! :-)

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    1. I bet that is one very interesting read.

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  4. That's beautiful!

    My RUBY
    Have a great Tuesday!

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    1. ...hope you had a great Tuesday also.

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  5. Very lovely costume and thank you for the history. Fascinating.

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    1. ...this area of the USA is so rich in history and different cultures

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  6. What a beautiful costume! Thanks for sharing this bit of history. I've never heard this before.

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    Replies
    1. ...stick around, you will always find something here. [kidding]

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  7. WOW!! Love that headdress. How interesting!

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    1. Some beautiful, intricate feather and bead work I'll agree.

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  8. That's a fascinating piece of history that I never knew before. Thanks Anni and beautiful shot of the headdress.

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    1. ...and thank YOU for the positive feedback Denise.

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  9. It's beautiful! I can imagine the time spent doing that.

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  10. Gorgeous headdress!

    I played too. Mine are here and here.

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    1. ...glad you see it as gorgeous.

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  11. that's a very impressive head dress in the photo. Interesting history as well. I didn't know any of that

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    1. ....some serious crafting in this work, to be sure.

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  12. Wow...that is awesome. I love the colors.
    http://www.mariasspace.com/2012/09/all-my-reds-from-weekend.html

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  13. Thanks for the awesome history in this post.

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    1. ...glad you enjoyed the post Denise.

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  14. Fascinating, creative detail in this little Indian! So love the facial expression!

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    1. ...you can see an expression? Just the eyes show through. You have a keen sense of vision.

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  15. Replies
    1. ...they are a very proud 'breed' and to display this shows their pride in so many ways.

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