“A wise old owl lived in an oak;
The more he saw the less he spoke;
The less he spoke the more he heard...
Why can't we all be like that bird?”
― Edward Hersey Richards




my POETRY | ANNI'S BOOK CRITIQUES | my ART | my BIRD photography | MLB | NFL | hurricanes






She haunts our reverie....


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I begin with an excerpt:
    Another drink and with chalk in hand, the vagabond began, To sketch a face that well might buy the soul of any man. Then, as he placed another lock upon that shapely head, With a fearful shriek, he leaped and fell across the picture — dead!


As you probably know by now my love of the 'arts'. And you also know I grew up in and raised my own family in Colorful Colorado. While I was scanning photos of one of our weekend trips through the Animas Canyon on the historic Silverton Train a few weeks back [links here and here], I also scanned this photo in hopes of sharing its history. It's from another of our many, many long weekend trips with our children so they could know the history of their home state. A little background of this photo I share:
    The Central City Opera House was built in 1878 by Welsh and Cornish miners. This National Historic Landmark, centerpiece of the historic gold mining town of Central City, has hosted performances of the nation's fifth-oldest opera company since 1932. Central City Opera's national summer festival attracts patrons from all over the country and abroad to enjoy intimate opera in its 550-seat opera house. In 1877, the citizens of Central City organized a fundraising drive for a grand new opera house befitting the gold mining town's reputation as "the richest square mile on earth." Many of the town's residents were Welsh and Cornish miners, who brought with them a rich tradition of music from their homeland. While locals pitched in during construction, the organizers also retained some of the best building professionals in the area. Prominent Denver architect Robert S. Roeschlaub provided an elegant, understated design for the stone structure, and San Francisco artist John C. Massman added elaborate trompe l'oeil murals to the interior. Read more...


The POEM; read here

HISTORY OF THE BARROOM PAINTING

51 comments :

  1. Never heard of that before, thanks for sharing.

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  2. Lovely piece of artwork. Spent a few days in Colorado Springs last fall. Loved it.
    Thanks for stopping by Driller's Place.

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  3. What a fun post! I love to learn of such histories.

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  4. Interesting history and such a great picture, Anni!
    When my children were young I took them to Durango and we rode the train to Silverton. Such beautiful country!
    Have a wonderful day!
    Debbie's Travels

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  5. Anni awesome photo and poem but will you please do me a favor and send me urls not links. I am never able to post your comments because of these.

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  6. So interesting. Wonderful!

    Happy RT!

    XOXO Lola:)

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  7. that's lovely
    the colors and texture are wonderful

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  8. Aw this is a very artistic share Anni. I think that face is painted straight to the wall because the painting is blending the wood. that's artistic..thanks for sharing. I do love operas although haven't been in one for real. I just watched through videos on youtube.

    Thanks for visiting my two rubies Anni. Yes, i'll tell you once I posted about the Sister's Keeper. I've watched it, it's a good one.

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  9. Cool! Thanks for visiting -- I'll come back and read about your Colorado trip -- we'll be there again next month (son and dil live near Boulder)....

    You might be interested in the post I will link to here, it's kind of mysterious too.

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  10. Great picture. Really amazing one.

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  11. It's beautiful.

    Thanks for visiting my Ruby.

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  12. What a beautiful picture. Happy RT!

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  13. This is cool. Good story.
    That is indeed a hobo. Gary has made an antire hobo village on his train layout.
    Good game last night.
    Good thing they aren't playing in NY without a DOME!
    B.

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  14. Gorgeous painting of a classic lady. Must be vintage? Hope you can visit my Ruby Tuesday page here.

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  15. Love this art! Thanks for sharing!
    Red Barn

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  16. We have visited Colorado, but of course not this Opera. I remember we visited a gold mine ghost town, but I am not so sure anymore it was in the 90th.
    I was in the South of France invited by a blogfriend that's why I didn't have time to visit ! It had been wonderful, I stayed with them a week and really felt home !

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  17. Hi Anni,

    Wow ... this is wonderful historical information. I truly enjoy your post today.

    Hope you have a terrific Tuesday!

    :-} Kathy M.

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  18. That was so interesting. I truly like to read all about your history and travels.
    thanks for sharing.

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  19. Gorgeous!

    Red Tulips is my RT, hope you can come and visit.

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  20. The verses sound like the song: Devil went down to Georgia. Just the way of the chant.
    Blessings,
    Mama Bear

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  21. Wonderful Texture work!
    Glad to have found/followed you...

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  22. Very interesting! Thanks for sharing!

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  23. beautiful beautiful work of art!

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  24. That is really something! Love the story of it being finished at 3am. Great shot (yes I can see it!)

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  25. I also love arts... But I haven't tried painting because the materials are quiet expensive....

    Thanks for the visit of my RT entry

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  26. It's such a great piece of Colorado history. When I worked at a bank in FC years ago, one of our services was selling tickets to the Central City operas - but I never made it to one. I did see the picture once. Good shot.

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  27. I like the poem! Interesting history, too! Thanks for sharing this.

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  28. Judy I'm sorry, but I really LIKE leaving links in comments. For the majority that has visited ...they thank me for the direct link.

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  29. Historical place.. Very nice.! I'm just loving it:)

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  30. Good To see Your Blog.....Thanks For Sharing

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  31. your blog has always been great.....

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  32. thank you so much for this blog......

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  33. Thanks for Sharing Wonderful Post..........Amazing Photo......Thanks

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  34. Such a great article. I like your story writing.

    Thanks for sharing such kind of story on the web.

    Regards

    Satish

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