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I'm not from Seville!! But it IS a barber---


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You don't see these very much anymore...a thing of the past. Let alone, if you do happen upon one, are they actually operating and spinning. Well, this one near our banking facility is actually in operating order AND it's lighted and spinning in all it's glory. I learned a bit about the 'barber pole'----it's from centuries ago. Borrowed from this site, it reads: "In the Middle Ages, hair was not the only thing that barbers cut. They also performed surgery, tooth extractions, and bloodletting. French authorities drew a fine distinction between academic surgeons (surgeons of the long robe) and barber surgeons (surgeons of the short robe), but the latter were sufficiently accepted by the fourteenth century to have their own guild, and in 1505 they were admitted to the faculty of the University of Paris. As an indication of their medical importance, Harry Perelman points out that Ambroise Pare, "The father of modern surgery and the greatest surgeon of the Renaissance,"began as a barber surgeon". The barber pole as a symbol of the profession is a legacy of bloodletting. The barber surgeon's necessities for that curious custom were a staff for the patient to grasp (so the veins on the arm would stand out sharply), a basin to hold leeches and catch blood, and a copious supply of linen bandages. After the operation was completed, the bandages would be hung on the staff and sometimes placed outside as advertisement. Twirled by the wind, they would form a red white spiral pattern that was later adopted for painted poles. The earliest poles were surmounted by a leech basin, which in time was transformed into a ball. One interpretation of the colors of the barber pole was that Red represented the blood, Blue the veins, and White the bandages. Which has been retained by the modern Barber-Stylist."

18 comments :

  1. Very interesting! Glad I didn't live during those times!

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  2. Very interesting facts about barbers. I wonder when they became just hair cutters and why.

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  3. nice photo. Thanks for sharing this :)

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  4. Hi! I’m following you now from Follow Me Back Tuesday. Please follow my blog of inspiring quotes and poems! Thanks!

    http://inspiredbyron.blogspot.com/

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  5. The signage is not commonly found here, they used to be everywhere when I was a child.

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  6. I don't think I would have cared for the blood-letting concept.

    Leeches? eww

    Interesting info about barber poles. Thanks for sharing ;-)

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  7. Wow, I'll certainly never look at a barber pole the same way again...
    :)
    I'm glad all that remains of the story is the pole!

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  8. Such an interesting post - as always!

    XOXO Lola:)

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  9. I'm glad we don't have to go to barbers for bloodletting anymore! Yick...

    Love your header graphic.

    -------------------------------
    Brand new at Around the Island Photography -- Photoverse Prints - Faith-Based and Inspirational Custom Photo Art

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  10. Stopping by to say Hi from FMBT.

    I am your new follower. Stop by for a visit when you get a chance.

    ~Bibi~
    www.dailyorganizedchaos.com

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  11. I am glad times have changed...! Interesting reading!

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  12. What a brilliant name for a blog! I love it!!! I am stopping by from Follow Me Back Tuesday Hop! I am now following your blog! I would love if you returned the follow to our blog at Just Married with Coupons

    Nice to meet you!
    -Dawn

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  13. I enjoyed reading this post.
    I remember the barber poles when I was young.It is bad you don't find them much anymore.
    Have a great day

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  14. Very interesting fact indeed... A bit scary to be honest :p...

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  15. yeah.. but there are some barbershops here that still used that as their decor :) nice find Anni!

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  16. My father-in-law was a dentist in Poland. When he came to the states, right after WWII, he couldn't afford to retrain to get his license here so he became a barber. After he earned enough money as a barber, he could take the necessary courses to be a dentist!!

    Best,
    Bonnie

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  17. Great post. Thank you for sharing.

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  18. thanks for the history lesson. it's amazing the backgrounds of different items in the world. rose

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