“A wise old owl lived in an oak;
The more he saw the less he spoke;
The less he spoke the more he heard...
Why can't we all be like that bird?”
― Edward Hersey Richards




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On Dubbing and Books

While waiting for the dryer to get done for the last load this weekend, I found myself back at the Digital Art Site, and playing with some of my photographs of birds!! Go Figure.  This time I clicked on 'filters' from the option menu, and then chose my preference of the HD values given.  I ended up doing five.  The original images are infused in the corner-- --


Red Necked Duck and Roseate Spoonbill

Northern Cardinal

Cooper's Hawk and Snowy Egret


...after dubbing a few minutes with the site and using the one filter & different preferences, I left to sit down and read a bit. I'm reading a very interesting history book. Well, a book ON history and the myths behind the liaison between two 'prominent' figures in America. One, of course, well known, the other very elusive and controversial . The history of a rumored affair with Sally Hemings and President Thomas Jefferson. Reading through the first 100 pages or so, I oftentimes felt like throwing the book at the wall....or maybe toss it in the fireplace. The author was so intent on defaming other known scholars who have written on the subject of the "love affair". In all my other previous readings ... all I have heard, and read, on the subject as truths!! This man [the author] contradicts everything I wanted to believe. A bunch of hogwash. Yet, after putting down the book at night, I laid in bed thinking about his words. "Maybe there is something to be said about what he is conveying."  Again, yes...there is DNA evidence that at least ONE of Ms. Hemings many children has Jefferson blood. But...now I question..."Was it THOMAS Jefferson? Or some relation from his plantation/family?" Mr. Holowchak continues throughout to delve into the bloodline and undocumented facts. The book itself is becoming an obsession for me now!! He turns the unproven facts of other authors and scholars into questions of doubt and more than likely a way to "Frame" this man of history....this legend. Is the title a play on words? Is he trying to convey some subliminal subject? Are other authors framing us into believing something that doesn't even exist? Framing a Legend? Just what does it all mean? So many questions: On page 90 [of the hardback book I have] it is quoted by another known scholar:
    "...Sally Hemings' story was a way of establishing black people's birthright to America. If you look at the flip side of it, rejecting the story is a part of the rejection of black people's birthright and claims to America."
The book's author then proceeds to continue and branding this quote as 'troublesome'. Reed [the scholar] also wrote an essay on the subject of the elusive Sally Hemings
    "The rejection of the Sally Hemings' story can be seen as a denial of black ties to the founding of the nation...."
I then began to agree with Mr. Holowchak...these claims and ideals are nothing but empty thoughts. I and Bud have argued over and over about history books. He's a 'believer'...I've always been skeptical about the facts being fiction. Now, reading this book and finally seeing my own reference of thought;  the actual FACTS written and recorded are nothing but hearsay....one man's [or woman's] opinions.  This book, tho I have always wanted to have a sultry, scandalous love affair between the two to be true, my own previous thoughts of historical scuttlebutt shows it's ugly face. Even being there and recording an event in history can become jumbled through the eyes of witnesses and different stories evolve....none of which are WHOLE truths.  Below I will add a link to a controversial interview from Madison Hemings....supposedly Thomas Jefferson's mulatto son....

Madison Hemings Interview - a PDF file

30 comments :

  1. What an interesting point to discuss. My husband, the history majoy in our family, would love this.
    And I also have never been to the digital art site!
    Your photos are wonderful!

    Enjoyed visiting,
    LAura

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    1. Thanks for the visit Laura.

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  2. Your pictures are amazing. I think I like the closeup of the hawk and the egret the best. And I don't have an opinion of the Hemings story, but maybe I should take a look at that book. Thanks for the tip. :-)

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    1. Well, if you don't know that much about the Jefferson/Hemings story, this probably won't pique your interest. Thanks for the 'art' work compliment D J

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  3. Hi Anni!:) It's fun to play around with our photo images, I was doing the same this morning with abstract shapes. I like the white birds in flight and the Cardinal. My knowledge of American history is poor, but now I'm interested in reading this book, I have read nothing to compare it with, but it should be a good read, and it's always good to get other peoples opinions about things. I'm reading Robert De Niro's biography at the moment,...second hand from Ebay. I'm a huge fan, and I'm looking forward to the Oscars tonight!:)

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    1. Yes, reading other opinions is good to know. But, after you choose to read this, perhaps another book on the same subject would be a good thing too.

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  4. Fascinating history!! I'm going to look for the book and hope I can find a copy!! Terrific post as always, Anni!! Thanks for sharing!! I hope you have a great new week!!

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    1. I think it was published 5-6 years ago, so you may have to resort to somewhere online to find it.

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  5. Many history documents have always had me wondering about the real and entire truth. I question everything, it seems.

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    1. Well, in my opinion, it's GOOD to question all.

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  6. I am a fan of history, and have to agree skeptical sometimes as the facts can seem to change depending on the writer's viewpoint! Sometimes. While waiting for your clothes to dry what a fine collection you uncovered. You always share the best of critters and nature!

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  7. Love the photos.
    As for the history, quite fascinating and who really knows just how much we've learned in the past is really as it was. The further back you go in time the less reliable some things may be.

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  8. Thank you for this insightful post

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  9. photofunia is one cool site.

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    1. That it is...and thank for the linking on your site for Tina!

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  10. I do like the Egret the best. I love to play around with photos. I have read about TJ and been to his home. I think he was just a regular man.....with regular ideas and needs.

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  11. The other day I saw a robin.
    As for DNA, I had mine done and it was surprising. All these years I was told my fathers mother side was French and Indian. I have none of those so called gene. Maybe after 2,000 years ago.

    Coffee is on

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    1. That's called ethnic DNA I think, and it's VERY expensive! I don't think I'd really rely on the results tho....

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  12. The book sounds fascinating. You are correct to question the motives of the author. I have read the same as you in the past and have no problem believing there was surely a relationship between Hemings and Jefferson. Could this be more history being rewritten as we are seeing these days?

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    1. I should think so....but he does make so many valid points. I must continue with this read to see what else is in store.

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  13. Your photos and the digital art from them are beautiful!
    The book sounds very interesting and you raise some good points. I don't know what to believe nowdays.

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    1. I'm with you on believing anything reported/written these days.

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  14. Lovely photos! Sounds like an interesting book.

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    1. After my initial mindset on the book/author, I too agree it is interesting. Thanks.

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  15. Interesting to say the least...I take everything almost with a grain of salt.

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