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Hum B [as in bird]

In late September, we had several dozen ruby throated hummingbirds in our yard at our multiple feeders. Both male and female. Now, mid October, there are only the females that remain. The male hummingbirds have left...that's a given each migrating season...both Spring and Fall Migration, the males are always the first to leave. Some say it's for the mating/nesting preferences, others surmise it gives the female and their young better choices of food for the long trek to their wintering grounds [summer habitat]. Personally, I think, after watching both genders, the male hummingbird is just way too dominate for their britches. There is a LOT of ego in that tiny bird!!! They're stingy, don't like sharing, territorial, and quite selfish. After mating, the male leaves [again] and the female nests, and rears the offspring by herself! All instinct. The survival of the fittest. Anyway, I have two more photos of the MALE in our backyard from September I'll share...




...now the remaining female hummingbirds that were at our feeders on Friday:






As the backyard population will dwindle in the next week or so, the usual time between the male leaving our area, and then the female and young, is about three weeks. Only a few will remain through the winter....perhaps a guesstimation of 5%.


35 comments :

  1. ahh they are so beautiful and gorgeous ,
    we find them here rarely .
    thank you for warming my eyes dear

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    1. Thank YOU, Baili, for your sweet comment.

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  2. Thank you so much, Ann. We never shall see this birds in The Netherlands. Only in the ZOO.

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    1. Well, I'm glad you stopped by then, Jedidja

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  3. They are so pretty! Our hummers are still in evidence, but much fewer. :-)

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    1. The numbers are dwindling as they begin to head south. Thanks DJ

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  4. who would have thought someone that handsome could act like that. a selfish humming bird. I am shocked to the core... LOL... they are beautiful, male and female. and now I KNOW... your description sounds a lot like some males from my distant past

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  5. Wonderful wonderful shots! You even got one with an open beak! In the double picture about halfway down, they look almost like teal, so pretty. I would guess that something so tiny just HAS to be feisty!

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    1. ...ya, when the sunlight hits them just right, their colors are so pretty!!!

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  6. When ours left they did it overnight and all were gone the next day! Is there a secret to getting the Canada Geese to go? There are now hundreds and hundreds more just meandering here.

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    1. When I grew up in Colorado, the Canada Geese were EVERYWHERE....all year long too. I remember that.

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  7. They're so pretty. I have never had any luck attracting them to my yard.

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    1. Two words...Duke and Gibbs.

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  8. I love those birds! We get a lot in the summer, but now they are visiting you. You take amazing photos!

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    1. They're keeping me busy replenishing the sugar water. Thanks Mari.

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  9. Wow - fabulous shots of these jewels.

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    1. Indeed....these are surely jewels of nature.

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  10. Magnificent shots of the lovely feathered friends ~

    Wishing you a Happy Week ~ ^_^

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  11. Absolutely brilliant pictures. One day I hope to see a wild hummingbird. I can't imagine how amazing it must be to get them in your garden. I will just have to enjoy your pictures for now until I get to see one for real.

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    1. Thanks Findlay....if ever you're here in Coastal Texas, let me know. You're more than welcome to view our yard during the hummer migration season .... or any time.

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    2. Thank you so much. If ever I get to travel that far your yard will be my first place to visit.

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    3. If you get a chance, & it's not hummingbird season, we could hit the 'hot spots' around town & islands.

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  12. Hi Anni. You had a super count of hummers there and its great that you not only feed them, but also count and separate into males/fenales. It's a very interesting theory that you have about the dominant males and a tribute to how observant you are. Love the phots, especially the one looking up and away. I know how tiny and fast those things are and so difficult to photograph

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    1. That happens to be a favorite of mine too. Thanks Phil.

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  13. May we display your header on our new site directory? As it is now, the site title (linked back to your home page) is listed, and we think displaying the header will attract more attention. In any event, we hope you will come by and see what is going on at SiteHoundSniffs.com.

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    1. What an incredible undertaking!! Sure...go ahead...it'd be an honor.

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    2. Thank you so very much for giving permission. Aside from the All category and the slideshow on the Home page, you can see your header under Fine Arts, Land/Sea/Skyscapes. Literary, Photography and the United States.

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  14. Lovely photos!
    Our Hummingbirds leave mid-to-late September in north Mississippi. There were a few stragglers coming through the first week of October. The feeders are still hanging just in case there are more.
    Have a great day!

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  15. Wonderful photos of these amazing little birds! I have observed the male behavior, myself, in our Rufous and Anna's here in WA state. It's not unusual for them to 'buzz' me as I go outside to fill the feeders! They are ferocious little things. Our Rufous have left for the winter, but the Anna's stay year round. I didn't know that until one January day when one came to my empty feeder. After some research I found out that they stay all year. We do have mild winters, but it does snow on occasion. I bought a heated feeder for them last year (a light bulb does the trick). I just love these little dynamos. - x Karen

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  16. I could set my calendar by the hummers. Mine (I think I own them) must be very upset with me. I didn't do them justice the end of the season as I had to be away because of my illness. Your pictures are so pretty.

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  17. male hummingbirds sound like some human males species too.

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  18. Gorgeous shots, Anni! I dread being where I will see the hummers go in the fall. It's so nice to have them year-round here. But, the trade-off is worth it of course! :-)

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  19. I just too down my hummer feeders.. these are wonderful photos... Michelle

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