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Got a good reason For taking the easy way out


God Blessed Tex-Us

In my previous post, I had an 'unknown' critter image. Well, unknown to some, but mostly, most guessed correctly. It was an eel. I also stated in that post that there was a 'story' behind the eel image. You see, on a cloudy, Sunday morning in the recent weeks, Bud and I took our early trek along the Oso Bay Nature Preserve Trail [one of them] and ended up at the elevated observation platform. Here, we witnessed the survival [aka hunting and killing techniques] skills of a Great Blue Heron. God Blessed Tex-us!! Just click on the thumbnail provided below. It's a little over 3 minutes' viewing time.


If the image and link doesn't load properly, here is the url: https://youtu.be/ndonyu0di_U


Continuing with the post, we drove to see what the flooded areas north and east of town were still like from the heavy rainfall in the past weeks....

I ordered a new camera, and I got notice on my phone app that it had arrived.  I opted for store pick-up [no postage that way and I could 'check it out' at the store to make sure I actually would be satisfied], so we ventured out to go pick it up. When we got back home, I played with it for a while to get the hang of some of its operations - I'm sure a lot of the things on it I'll never use.  But it has a more powerful zoom lens.  I will now need a new tripod when we go birding.  LOL  The high powered zoom makes the images way too blurry with just being hand held.

On Tuesday, we took a little time from some of the work we're doing around the house; just to get away for a few hours.  We decided to drive to a small town on highway 77 to check out the course of the river that has been flooding the area.  As we have been keeping up with the conditions near a park we frequent, we drove to the park.  Some of the area is on a bluff...here there is a  hawk watch platform.  The entire park, with picnic tables and boating ramps is in, more or less, a valley.  We can climb the hawk watch tower and view down below.

Altho, it's receding quite a bit, there is still tell-tale signs of heavy flooding that has closed the park for nearly 2 weeks...



Two ponds that are 'normal'...in other words, this is a continual thing.  But the next photo [use of zoom lens from the hawk watch platform] is of a large tree root in the river.  THAT has never been there before this year...the flood waters obviously carried this from upstream to here.  And, if you enlarge the photo you can see the bubble action on the river top...on any normal day you don't 'see' the current.  Normally, this is a slow moving, QUIET river.  And the banks of the river are wider than what it 'should be'.

More of the river and it's more rapid current, and over flowing banks.  The next photo, if you enlarge it, you can see quite a lot of standing water over the 'valley'....this is receding flood waters...by the looks of the surrounding area, this was all under water at the peak of the flooding!! [both with use of zoom lens]

There are two ducks in the upper left hand corner of this next photo.  And the wood jutting up in the grasses of the park...never there before [zoom lens].  And the last photo, Bud and I walked from the hawk platform down the park road and began walking down the hill toward the river...this is the park road that goes around the area, to the picnic area/river bottom/boat and kayak ramps.  The river is along the tree line in the background.  The park road is still closed.  And probably will remain closed for some time yet.  We drove home over the interstate highway and heading south, looking off to the left of the highway, the river was still out of it's banks by several feet.  The closer to the Gulf we got...heavy flooding in the bottom land still!!  If I remember correctly, the media/news/weather app on the phone stated the Nueces River crested at 29.8 feet.  Which is about 10 to 15 feet above it's banks.  That is some DEEP flooding.


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The eels found in Texas:

Texas distribution: Originally found in large rivers from the Red River to the Rio Grande. Extirpated in several drainages, attributed to reservoirs that impede upstream migration (Hubbs et al. 1991). Warren et al. (2000) listed the following drainage units for distribution of american eel in the state: Red River (from the mouth upstream to and including the Kiamichi River), Sabine Lake (including minor coastal drainages west to Galveston Bay), Galveston Bay (including minor coastal drainages west to mouth of Brazos River), Brazos River, Colorado River, San Antonio Bay (including minor coastal drainages west of mouth of Colorado River to mouth of Nueces River), Nueces River. Hubbs (2002) reported that dams have precluded young eels from repopulating Caddo Lake in northeast Texas.
Common name: American Eel

Synonyms and Other Names: American Eel, Anguille, black eel, bronze eel, glass eel, green eel, river eel, silver eel, yellow eel.  http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/factsheet.aspx?SpeciesID=310


Pages in a book found through GOOGLE reads of eels in Oso Bay and around the coastal waters near Corpus Christi.

33 comments :

  1. I'm not bothered by fish, toads, frogs... not even snakes, but eels? ICK!

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  2. That must be a hungry heron to eat two eels! They are great hunters. The flooding looks so scary, I feel sorry for the families that have lost so much. I hope you stay safe there and that the flood water recede soon. Have a happy Thursday!

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  3. Oh my, the flooding was awful! Wow, what a video! That Heron...can eat as many of those eels as possible, don't like them one bit! Yes, and God bless Texas! Great music, got me going along with my first cup of coffee!Thank you!

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  4. So much deep flooding! But my goodness, what an amazing series of shots in that slideshow!! Thank you so much for sharing that. Enjoyed the music too. :-)

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  5. This was so informative and interesting. Flooding really affects the wildlife too, doesn't it?

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  6. Very interesting to see this EEL. That flooding has really been something hasn't it! Hoping the rains abate here for a little while for some catch up

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  7. I think your new camera is doing a great job. I know what you mean about zoom lenses needing a tripod, but yours is working great! Congratulations on your new purchase, and hopefully I'll be seeing plenty more with it. Glad you didn't get hit any harder than you did from all that rain. :-)

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  8. Very interesting, Anni! I enjoyed the video too. Great photos! Can't imagine them being any better with your new camera, but will watch for a difference!

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  9. Wow Anni, What an interesting post and that video was awesome. Love the music too. God Bless Texas!! Great job with your new camera.
    Hugs, CM

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  10. Anni, you have such wonderful pictures, and the eel and heron pictures are fascinating. I can't believe she ate the whole thing!

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  11. I loved the slideshow, Anni. I didn't know an Eel (or was that a snake) could be a nice lunch (I reckon, like a flexible sub sandwich for a heron) for large birds - wow! The photos are very nice. I thank you for visiting my site today.
    Have a Wonderful Day!
    Peace :)

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  12. Always a joy visiting your blog and seeing all the interesting things you share.

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  13. Eels are pretty slimy. I remember catching them on Jekyll Island when I was younger. They'd turn your leader into a disgusting useless knot in a hurry!
    ~

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  14. Your posts and photos are always a great way to start my day and today is no exception!! Thanks, as always, Anni, for sharing the fun and the beauty!! Hope you have a wonderful weekend!!

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  15. Great video, I have heard herons eat snakes and eel but never seen it before.

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  16. I sure do hope the rain hoovering over Texas has moved away!! What a mess you all had
    Hugs madi and mom

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  17. The flooding must be bad in some parts. Hope you really enjoy your new camera.

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  18. Well done, Anni!! Loved seeing the beautiful heron successfully hunting.

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  19. So sorry to hear of all the flooding there. It looks pretty bad. I sure enjoyed your Heron/Eel video.

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  20. A very interesting post as usual. Most of our water is gone but we sure have to dodge the chug holes.

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  21. Very interesting post! That's a lot of water!

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  22. I have been thinking about you all down in Texas and praying for safety, how sad! WOW that is incredible image taking of the Great Blue Heron and that huge meal, very well documented!

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  23. Dearest Anni; We have many flooding in Japan every year! Rainy season has started and pouring down outside. Fascinating video blue heron eating eel with its wing wide open etc☆☆☆ Very Expensive Lunch (if they were cooked like we have here in Japan) ♪

    Sending Lots of Love and Hugs from Japan to my Dear friend in America, xoxo Miyako*

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  24. Hi Anni, Always an interesting post here on your Chronicles. Nice work! How is your recovery coming along? Wishing you the best.

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  25. pretty neat eel wrangling!

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  26. I know it's officially an eel..but to me, its's a snake!! I drove out to see two of my favorite camping lakes and both are still mostly underwater. I was looking at the edges and all the logs, brush and just general muck that will probably take all summer to clean up. That's just on the lakes..the river will leave a mush bigger mess. Have a nice weekend..I hear we may get more rain late next week, but I am happy to have at least a few more days of gorgeous sunshine.

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  27. An eel that filled the whole stomach of the heron.

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  28. Hello Anni, dropping by to say thank you for linking up and sharing your post. Have a happy weekend!

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  29. Amazing to see heron with eel. Interesting photos of the floodwaters
    Have a great day!

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  30. Great video Anni. That Heron sure can fish adn put it away!

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  31. Just loved that awesome slide show and music! Very cool! Glad you got such great photos of the great blue heron and the eel! Happy also you have a new camera. You'll have fun learning all its ins and outs. Really sad about the flooding, but I did enjoy the pictures. Hope there's no more rain for a long while! Have a great weekend, Anni!

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  32. Oh yes, I hope everybody has good luck recovering from the flooding.
    ~

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  33. Herons are very skilled at what they do! Great sequence of photos!

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