my POETRY | ANNI'S BOOK CRITIQUES | my ART | my BIRD photography | MLB | NFL | hurricanes



Got a good reason For taking the easy way out




PART TWO - Voices of South Texas

If you're interested, and missed my previous post, here's the link:
PART ONE of the Voices of South Texas


For the beginning, I'm going to take you back to the 1800s along the coast of the Texas Coastal Bend. Standing on the bluff, looking toward the Bay of Corpus Christi [looking east, northeast] the view on the hill would be unobstructed. Only the year 'round green prairie grasses below your feet, and the glistening water of the sea as it ebbed and flowed. A few live oak trees and the bending twisting and gnarled stand of mesquite trees with their wispy fern like leaf clusters would be gently swaying in the breeze. A beautiful, quiet, tranquil and peaceful surrounding. There would be no tall buildings and paved streets, no ship channel bridge or heavy traffic that you'd see today. The two diagrams/mappings seen below show you what the area looked like in different decades in the 1800s. Later in history a ship channel was dredged since, at this time, the bay was not deep enough for ships to dock...the ships had to moor near what is now Ingleside Texas, closer to the Gulf of Mexico and deeper waters...
...from an army camp to where Water Street was actually ON the shore [2nd map circa 1887].  Today Water Street is a block away, now there is Shoreline Drive. 

 Corpus Christi wasn't always so named. In the early 1800s, it was best known as Kinney's Ranch [circa the time frame of the first cemetery in 1845]. In 1852, Kinney's Ranch became incorporated...Corpus Christi now existed on the map with a population of 175 in 1860. The first mayor was Benjamin Neal. Ironically and historically I believe the "Neal" family is still a big part of the city today...Samuel Neal, also a prominent judge, may be a descendant of  Judge Benjamin[?].



Kinney's Ranch became a prominent military outpost in the 1800s. Under the command of Zachary Taylor [in time, he'd become our 12th President]. With the Annexation of Texas, with victories of many battles in the area, he became a national hero. But, while he was in command, a sidewheeler steamship, the "Dayton", experienced an explosion in the boiler, killing several troops [sailors] including officers on board. There was then, a dire need of a burial ground. Taylor acquired, from Kinney, land that would become the first cemetery in Corpus Christi. AND the OLDEST Federal Cemetery in the state of Texas...nearly 170 years in existence. Old Bayview, became a burial ground for military veterans of several wars, pioneers and young children, prominent dignitaries to even slaves. It's a monument, an historical landmark,  teeming with history of this area.

There are many State of Texas Historical Markers within the cemetery compound...




I will conclude this walking tour on a sad note of our 'modern history' and its effect at Old Bayview Cemetery. To be continued...

33 comments :

  1. We have a Bayview Cemetery here in Bellingham, too. Different bay, though. Interesting history and fascinating pictures to compare! :-)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Love old cemeteries! Tom The Backroads Traveller

    ReplyDelete
  3. i know that's not ancient for europe, but sure is old for texas.

    ReplyDelete
  4. My deceased husband's uncle lived in Ingleside for years. Interesting info. here. I didn't know Corpus Christi wasn't always named that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...well then, my post was worth while. Glad you found a bit of history to CC's name.

      Delete
  5. Great post for the day as always, Anni! I grew up in Texas and loved visiting Corpus Christi, but I didn't know it wasn't always named that either!! Hope your week is off to a great start! Enjoy!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ....thanks Sylvia. Enjoy your week also.

      Delete
  6. Thank you for such a detailed informative post about this place. I sure enjoyed the photos from part one, and between you and me, I think someday farther down the road I would love to join one of these groups. I just love to watch them perform and stay in their character's period time when some younger children try to get them to break away.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...oh how fun. I know I'd enjoy your participation!!

      Delete
  7. yes, feel free to use any of my post and can't wait to here your story. I do love to visit old cemeterys

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...thank you...I'll be sure to let you know.

      Delete
  8. Living in Texas, I have found that the history is so compelling, and I can't get enough. So thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...I'm happy to read your feedback Linda. Thanks.

      Delete
  9. I bet many people go past this and don't even know the story...it is good to always remember!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's in the older part of town, so you're probably right...not too many travel that area.

      Delete
  10. How many of those signs have I just driven past without a thought. Time to slow down a bit and start paying attention! You tell this story so well, Anni! Thanks for the history lessons!!

    In response to your comment on my post this morning, I am sitting down in that picture of Joe and me.... I am just a smidgeon under six feet tall. Joe is 6'2".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought you were taller!!! Glad you're enjoying this bit of history Terri.

      Delete
  11. As a bit of a history buff I'm truly enjoying this glimpse of Corpus Christi history. =)

    ReplyDelete
  12. I did not know that Corpus Christi had another name. Can't imagine it being called anything else! I played in a tennis tournament there once and fell in love with the area.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...it is a pretty area...in MOST areas. lol
      Thanks for visiting Gail

      Delete
  13. I love history, and I am a taphophile ( to the extent of photographing graveyards and learning the history of them) along with being a genealogist and family historian. I am enjoying your trip back in time. Very interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will have one more post to complete the series. I'm glad you're enjoying this Terri

      Delete
  14. Fascinating historical post ~ very informative plus my son lived in Corpus Christi for awhile in the late 90's early 2000 ~ lovely area.

    Happy Week to you,
    artmusedog and carol
    A Creative Harbor

    ReplyDelete
  15. interesting history lesson.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Wow! really wonderful two posts! (How did I miss paret I? I went back & looked at it) with so much interesting history! Love the re-enactments of the dead. It's a great idea, and something I'd love to see in more cemeteries, especially those with lots of veterans!

    ReplyDelete
  17. what a wonderful piece of history. again thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I always love cemeteries, the older the better!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Interesting post, Anni. I didn't know Corpus Christi had another name.

    ReplyDelete
  20. The perfect post for Veteran's Day. Love old cemetaries and this one sure has a lot of history! I'm going to go back and read Part 1 when I have more time.

    ReplyDelete

.