“A wise old owl lived in an oak;
The more he saw the less he spoke;
The less he spoke the more he heard...
Why can't we all be like that bird?”
― Edward Hersey Richards




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Cotton Harvest ...and a Bit of History

Quite a few weeks ago, I showed photos of some of the cotton fields seen around the outskirts of the city. Well, they've all been harvested by now, and the fields are plowed for the next growing season. I've seen cotton bales just within the last two or three weeks...but, nothing like you see from yesteryear. They're baled in rolls now-a-days and wrapped in yellow plastic for protection from the elements before hauled and shipped out through the railroads and/or ships in the harbor....

Near Chapman Ranch, about 20 miles from Corpus, the area still has a standing and operating Cotton Gin. We've driven by it many times while heading toward Kingsville, Texas and farther south. But that isn't my post today. Remember when I posted a photo of a Quonset Hut? Behind that hut, by several hundred yards, I spotted a building of galvanized material that resembled by shape, a cotton gin. Right in the middle of a busy street!! I couldn't get it out of my mind. I searched the internet with local interest and found nothing on the history of the area. Then, one day while perusing our local newspaper online, I come across Corpus Christi in History...and clicked on it. There, in the annals of some articles, was an advertisement under the job listings...dated: circa late 1940s early 1950s [I can't recall the exact date]. It was an advertisement for jobs at a cotton gin....on what is now a city street here in town that I saw what I thought was an abandoned gin at the time of photographing the Quonset Hut!!! The address in the ad told me I was correct in assumption. I just had to drive back and try and get some photos while still not trespassing. All that much. lol

I pulled the car into a parking lot across the street from the Quonset Hut...grabbed my camera and crossed the street. I first took photos from the sidewalk, using my zoom lens. Then, either stupidity or bravery grabbed my psyche and I walked beyond the sidewalk, between the Quonset Hut and a large shed, then snapped a few more photos. By the time I took two or three photos I began leaving as quickly as I could, and behold...a city worker was mowing the high grass from the sidewalk! With the mowing, he helped me out somewhat, revealing an OLD railway track! I took photos of those tracks, still well hidden in the freshly mowed grass.  I'm really surprised I didn't trip and fall on them beforehand, and would still like to know the history of this particular cotton gin....


71 comments :

  1. You got some great photos Anni. This would be a fun place to explore.

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    1. ...yes it would be great to be able to walk around it more, but in a way, it's okay to just stand back and take pictures...as I'm sure there are rats and snakes in this rubble. THAT I don't like one iota.

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  2. Always fun uncovering a bit of history. You were brave moving in for the shots. I'm always a bit too chicken to do things like that

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    1. Indeed it is fun...and when I find these out of the way, unknown places, I am thrilled. LOL

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  3. Great shot of this Quonset Hut, you are brave to get closer. My favorite shot is the top photo of the field and cotton.. have a happy Sunday!

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    1. ...this yellow wrap is all new to me.

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  4. Thanks for the cotton field shot. I have never seen such a big cotton ball before. Really fascinating.

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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    1. ...glad you enjoyed this post Mersad

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  5. this is amazing and so were you to be brave and go in a ways to get the photos... this is more history that is abandoned that without the internet know one would know what it used to be. good job on the info search....

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    1. ...exactly! But there WAS an ulterior motive to prove myself right and Bud wrong. rofl

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  6. Being brave is THE way to get the good shots. Nicely done!

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    1. ...thanks Michelle. At least I wasn't locked in the slammer for trespassing.

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  7. That was fun, and I'm sure glad you didn't trip over that old railroad bed. :-)

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    1. ...ironic, I was just at your blog to see if I missed anything. LOL
      Glad you enjoyed this DJ

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  8. How amazing to discover a bit more of history!! I love the fact you have such an inquiring mind and are always looking deeper into the things you find with your camera! You are pretty amazing!

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    1. ...thanks for the compliments Linda. Are you still traveling? Or arrived home safely now?

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  9. I've never seen a yellow covering on cotton before. Interesting how they are starting to look like our big, huge rolls of hay. Well, except for the color. What a great find! I'm a bit too chicken to go walking about. Too afraid of being arrested for trespassing. I work in the courthouse. lol. Love that you also found the rail track without a trip or two. I'm sure I would have been sprawled out near one of those snakes creeping out of the old building.

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    1. I never thought of snakes much 'til after I got back in the car...it was rats that I first thought of...and that kept me from going any closer. lol

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  10. Very cool, aren't you the explorer.

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  11. You are indeed quite the explorer, Anni!! I think that's terrific -- can see so much that others miss!! Great shots and such an interesting post!! That is a HUGE bale of cotton! Does bring me memories of childhood in Texas!! Have a beautiful day!!

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    1. ...glad you enjoyed this...and perhaps brought back happy memories?

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  12. An adventure for sure! And WOW, I have never seen a cotton field, and did not even know that cotton is bailed!!! So I am loving your first picture.

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    1. Super...but the first photo is not mine....just a Google Image share.

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  13. What fun to see these cotton bales. In the Netherlands we have no cotton fields but these large bales in the country. Just sit there hay / grass in food for the cows in the winter. Fun and interesting blog

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    1. I'm glad you enjoyed this Helma.

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  14. Curiosity led you to get some great and interesting pictures.

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    1. Yes....it had a-hold on me for sure.

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  15. Fascinating! Thanks for sharing. :)

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  16. This would make me want to see more...and more...and more. And wondering/hoping you find out more of the history. I love things like this.

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  17. Hey these pictures were worth almost getting arrested. Very interesting.

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  18. Interesting entry, thanks for sharing.

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  19. When I was MUCH younger, I used to enter abandoned and tumble down homes and explore. I would imagine living in there. Still, to this day I WANT to enter abandoned buildings, but, alas, I know better now. You found nice pieces of history. There is no cure for curiosity, don'tcha know!

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    1. ...the curiosity got the better of me this time 'round for sure.

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  20. Anni you and Bud find the most interesting things to photograph...maybe with your graphic skills you should make yourself a 'fancy official Photographer for the .....
    Magazine.." badge.
    Hugs madi and mom

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    1. ...it was on my mind for a long long time...I just had to somehow get photos of this.

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  21. Informative post and photos for OWT ~ thanks!

    Happy Day to you.

    artmusedog and carol (A Creative Harbor)

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  22. It is always interesting to find old forgotten history like this, Annie! Railraod were much more utilized back in the day. I am also enjoying learning more about my area's frontier and gold rush history.

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    1. ....yes, history is something you must learn...especially around where you live. I so agree. Hope you share some of your learnings with your blog.

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  23. You definitely opened some memories for me. I picked many a pound of cotton pulling a sack. We did things the hard way for many year.

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    1. ....oh boy, I'm sure it was back breaking work!!

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  24. Very interesting. I particularly love the first shot.

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  25. I haven't seen cotton since the late 60s. Tom The Backroads Traveller

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    1. ...well, 50 years later, you can now say you saw it here...at least in photo form. lol

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  26. The cotton looks neat! The only times I've seen cottonfields have been in the summer, so I've never seen anything quite look that--looks almost like snow!

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    1. Well then....glad you stopped by today Bethany.

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  27. Lovely shots of the old ranches.

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    1. ...glad you enjoyed this Fiona.

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  28. You are awesome, Anni! I love your adventurous spirit.

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    1. ...You're more so Veronica...just LOOK at your talents.

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    2. Thanks for the kind words!

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  29. what a great find Anni. I love to photography old buildings like this.

    wonderful images.

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  30. Your photos are beautiful but , I love cotton field photo! It reminds me of childhood. My mother used to grow cotton in the garden! :)

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  31. These are wonderful images!

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  32. Neat old building. I hope you find out it's history. How cool to find the hidden rusty tracks.

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    1. I'm pretty sure I'd have to find someone that was born here to get any more info than the newspaper had.

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  33. The bale of hay looks like a Quonset hut. I love a historical hunt like yours and, ooh, the thrill of discovering something such as the hidden rails. Good cheer!
    Take 25 to Hollister

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    1. Yes, it does now that you mention it. It's cotton tho, not hay. Seriously, I'm surprised that I didn't trip over them when I walked ONTO the property. I'm klutzy like that.

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  34. You are braver than I am Anni... But I love tracking down a mystery and you got some good photos... Michelle

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    1. ...perhaps 'dumber' would be a more appropriate word. LOL Thanks Michelle.

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