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Got a good reason For taking the easy way out


Star of the Republic


Victor - "So, how long have those three been here roaming the grounds?"
Viola - "Quite a long time...All I know is, I'm ready to dine on some fresh meat."
Victor - "Ya, me too. I am tired of Roadkill Cafe back yonder."
The two, Victor and Viola Vulture, watch the grounds wanderers' every move; they sit in silence until Victor, leaning close to Viola's ear, whispers:
Victor - "Patience my feathery arse, I'm gonna....." as he leaves Viola in the treetops and swoops down on the three unsuspecting tourists...



connecting to:
The Bird D'Pot
*Saturday Photo Hunt* this week's challenge: BELLS ---scroll down please!
Camera Critters
_ _ _





The last photos to share from our three day weekend last month is of a great museum....The Star of the Republic. You begin your tour with a 20 minute video in the theater. It gives the history of the state's beginnings, from the prehistoric, to the Native Americans, the Mexico's dictator Santa Anna, the Alamo, the players in the part of the war, becoming a nation...The Republic of Texas...to eventually joining the Union as the 28th state of the United States of America. The museum is two floors. Here is an abbreviated tour of what is behind the closed doors as you enter...

Prehistoric artifacts -- to a new Nation


The last days of the city, Washington Texas, to Texas the largest state at the time [in area] --Texas' size was inclusive of parts of Oklahoma, New Mexico, Colorado and of course, Texas back then.

...the Declaration of Independence of the Republic of Texas
One of the most important documents in Texas history is the Declaration of Independence, adopted in general convention at Washington-on-the-Brazos, March 2, 1836. Richard Ellis, president of the convention, appointed a committee of five to write the declaration for submission to the convention. However, there is much evidence that George C. Childress, one of the members, wrote the document with little or no help from the other members. Childress is therefore generally accepted as the author. The text of the declaration is followed by the names of the signers of the document in the style in which they signed the document [a section reads as follows]:
    "....When in consequence of such acts of malfeasance and abdication, on the part of the government, anarchy prevails, and civil society is dissolved into its original elements: In such a crisis, the first law of nature, the right of self-preservation – the inherent and inalienable right of the people to appeal to first principles and take their political affairs into their own hands in extreme cases – enjoins it as a right towards themselves and a sacred obligation to their posterity, to abolish such government and create another in its stead, calculated to rescue them from impending dangers, and to secure their future welfare and happiness...."

George C. Childress [credited for composition of the Republic of Texas Declaration]
Statue outside the entrance to the Washington on the Brazos Park

Dr. Anson Jones...the 5th and last president of the Republic of Texas
[his home is part of the complex...with a live-on-the grounds living *Like Williamsburg, VA*]
While in Houston, in 1858, he committed suicide. Buried in Houston Texas


- - -

...from artifacts to historical items of the era

LEFT:The TEXAS RANGERS is the oldest law enforcement agency in the United States. Beginning with 10 men, formed by Stephen Austin [Austin, Texas named after Stephen] -circa 1820. By 1835, there were 25 employed. In 1935, to the very month of its 1835 onset of 25 men, the Texas Rangers became part of the Department of Public Safety. Today with a mere 170 employees/rangers, the modern Texas Ranger dresses in civilian clothes and is recognized by his western hat and western boots. Badges, still made from a Mexican coin, can be seen pinned to a Ranger’s shirt above the left pocket. Their duties vary by assignment, but are generally criminal investigative responsibilities while supporting local law enforcement. RIGHT: relics from school to the frontier


BOWIE KNIFE The most famous version of the Bowie knife was designed by Jim Bowie and presented to Arkansas blacksmith James Black in the form of a carved wooden model in December 1830




The YELLOWSTONE replica seen here is part of historical interest...built in Louisville, Kentucky in 1831, for use on the Missouri River by the American Fur Company. Purchased by McKinney, Williams and Company in 1835, the Yellowstone carried cotton and other produce on the Brazos River to be shipped to New Orleans. This 144 ton sidewheeler was 122 feet long, 20 1/2 feet wide, and had a six foot draft, or depth of hull. During the Texas Revolution, General Sam Houston took over the Yellowstone to help his army cross the flooded Brazos River. After the army was safely across, the captain out-maneuvered the Mexican troops, who shot at the boat and even tried to lasso the smokestacks. The Yellowstone also carried the body of Stephen F. Austin from Columbia to Peach Point for burial in December 1836. The Yellowstone sank in Buffalo Bayou [Houston] in 1837. The bell, the only know remnant, is now located at the Alamo in San Antonio.


HAND STITCHED QUILT made my Frances Smyth in 1845, wife of George Washington Smyth, a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence. The quilt was donated to the museum by Smyths' great great grandchildren.


...as the day worn on, the skies were looking fierce. We decided to move on - in the Hill Country...if it rains, there are places that can flood quickly!!!











FURTHER READING...
Republic of Texas DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE [in whole, including all those who signed the document]
Republic of Texas CONSTITUTION [in whole - 1836]

62 comments :

  1. Great post, Anni! Love the vulture shot! Have a great weekend!

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  2. Very interesting stuff here, Anni. I hope you have a great weekend and spend some time with your loved ones...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...enjoy your weekend too DJan.

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  3. jWow Annie I did not know Texas had such a rich history. Continue to love and read your blog. I don't always comment, but am faithful in reading your every post.

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  4. I like their conspiring looks. :)

    Thank you very much for your comment on my blog.

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    Replies
    1. ...they DO look conspiring. Great description.

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  5. Love those vultures! remind me of Snoopy when he visits his cousin in the desert :) Love the bright bell too. To your question: it's a local church.
    Happy weekend!!

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    Replies
    1. ...thanks Mar...happy weekend to you also.

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  6. Hello Anni
    Great post you show - and great new header you've got.
    Wish you a good weekend :)
    Hanne Bente

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    Replies
    1. ...thanks Hanne; glad you enjoyed the holiday header I added this week.

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  7. I think vultures are so cool!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...I guess they are...without them, the environment would need an overdose of rats pro'bly. ;o)

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  8. Those vultures look scary! :O

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...I'd say more like .........."eww"

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  9. I love the vulture shot!
    This looks like such an interesting place to visit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...it is, but with all road trips, there is never enough time to see it all. :o(

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  10. Lindo teu post! abraços,chica e FELIZ NATAL!

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    Replies
    1. ...thanks Chica for the 'cute' comment. AND I wish you the very same.

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  11. Hi Anni, I loved reading more about the history of Texas. I lived there for 12 yrs. but never did take time to learn much about the history. Thanks so much!!!!

    Great picture of the vultures--and I love your captions.... Cute..
    Hugs,
    Betsy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...long ago, you couldn't catch me reading or 'learning' history. Now, I really enjoy it.

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  12. Replies
    1. ...thanks, glad you enjoyed 'em.

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  13. Great post!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

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  14. Sure, go ahead and link to my blog if you would like. Thank you for your comments. Glad that you liked the photos.
    Ann

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. well....I won't do it, but you're certainly invited to join in. Anytime.

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  15. Again an enjoyable tour, thanks for taking us along. Like the vulture picture but they sure are ugly birds

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    Replies
    1. indeed, they're ugly, I agree.

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  16. Victor and Viola cracked us up? We love the history you share from your State
    Hugs
    Madi and mom

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    Replies
    1. ...glad you enjoyed the post M&M.

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  17. Oh my...every time I visit here I get so home sick for Texas. I feel very fortunate to be able to call Texas home!! But I guess all native Texans feel that way. Wow it is an awesome state though with incredible and exciting history!!

    Thanks for sharing and I love your Christmas header!!:-)

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    Replies
    1. ...thanks Jackie. Well, I'm not native Texan but I got here as quickly as I could.

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  18. Great post, and the vultures' conversation is fabulous :-)

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  19. Omigosh, too funny, it looked like those two vultures were saying exactly what you wrote! lol

    The Star of the Republic museum looks like it was quite interesting and how wonderful to be able to see so many actual artifacts from those early days. I love learning the history behind places as I know you do too!! I wonder why Dr. Anson Jones committed suicide?

    I'm finally taking time to visit blogs, I'm soooo behind again! xoxo

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    Replies
    1. Glad you stopped by Pea. Your Christmas tree is absolutely stunning!!

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  20. Replies
    1. Dora...I'm assuming you enjoyed the post?

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  21. Love the vultures!!! ...and the Texas Rangers (both the real ones and the hockey ones)

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    Replies
    1. Texas Rangers....that's baseball. I think vultures are so ugly, that they're cool.

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  22. Thanks for help in promoting the blogfest, Anni! This is a fascinating post about Texas History. I knew there was quite a bit around Houston and I have been around Buffalo Bayou before.

    Those vultures look HUGE compared to the trees...what an optical illusion! I think they could eat a tourist or two.

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    Replies
    1. You're welcome. I hope to come back after my hiatus and read some of them from your 'fest'.

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  23. I remember when school was run on time with bells. Lovely one in the museum.

    My bells are at http://hindmarsh-island.com/?p=1000

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    Replies
    1. tolles Bild von den Geiern..

      immer Hunger und sehr geduldig

      LG zum 3. Advent vom katerchen

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    2. 'tomcat'....they ARE a patient bird, I'll give you that.

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    3. Vicki: Thanks for stopping by....school bells have a great nostalgic 'feel', don't they?

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  24. Hi Anni, your not only artistic and creative.. your a wonderful teacher as well. Great post, well done!

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  25. I am a 57 year old born and raised Texan...all my life spent in one area and no desire to go elsewhere...and I didn't know some of these facts. I enjoyed your tour. Where is this museum? Austin? LBJ ranch maybe? I would like to go visit myself some day when I am on vacation. Love the vultures!

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    Replies
    1. ...it's on the Washington on the Brazos...between Houston and Austin. If you ever go there, I know you'll enjoy the history and the scenery too.

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  26. Interessante, aliou história com imagens, parabéns pelo post! Um abraço!

    http://omirantedaimagem.blogspot.com.br/2012/12/sinos.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...thank you for visiting.

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  27. Great shot of the Black Vultures Anni! Victor and Viola, great!

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  28. Replies
    1. ...glad you enjoyed it Denise

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  29. You are amazing.
    I have just spent the weekend with my grandbaby... a good reason to delay visiting the photohunts!'
    Happy Holidays y'all~

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    Replies
    1. ...thanks for hosting Sandi.

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  30. Our children all went to elementary and high school in Texas, as we lived in Dallas. I too was surprised at the rich history of the state, and the amount of attention it was given in their curriculum.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...it was the same in Colorado also, the state's history was even a class required in Jr. High. [middle school now-a-days]

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