“A wise old owl lived in an oak;
The more he saw the less he spoke;
The less he spoke the more he heard...
Why can't we all be like that bird?”
― Edward Hersey Richards




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Shadows of a downtown park area...

Among the Live Oak, Mesquite, Pine trees and Willows, there is an area shadowed and cool in the heat of the summer, quiet and tranquil in the winter...a nice place year 'round.  Oftentimes, when we do a little birding, we end up at a great place to see bird activities throughout the year. It's a favorite close-by section of town that I've posted about a few times previously. And it's right in the middle of  downtown. Up on the bluff is where you may find me.  You may see me at the park that has the name of Blucher Park. It is on the list of the Coastal Birding areas of this part of Texas. The land was donated by the Blucher family that settled in Corpus Christi in the 1800s. Felix Anton von Blucher was an immigrant from Germany. According to the online biography [previous link], he contributed much in what would be the birth of our city --surveyor, city councilman, city charterman [he instigated the dredging of the water outlet which would become eventually the 3rd busiest port ship channel in the United States], engineer, along with many other feats ---bi-lingual, he was able to speak fluently Latin, German, English, Italian, French and Spanish. According to his bio, he was also an accomplished artist. Corpus Christi was, in 1849, merely a ranch, owned by Aubrey and Kinney. Felix Blucher bought an eight-acre tract which had been previously used as a small farm. He set up his office in a building at his home. This is where the park is located ---and several of his family's homes you'll find across the street. The one on the corner was Felix's home while the others were eventually built to accommodate his growing family. Today, the Blucher House is a Bed and Breakfast, other homes along the street are now business offices, housing lawyers and such.  Walk with me, among the shadows of the oaks, as I point out the historical homes...




THE BLUCHER HOUSE on the corner
Now a Bed and Breakfast
[along the side street in the rear of the house stands erected a carriage house that now is used as a covered garage for parking the guest's automobiles]














Once another Blucher Family Residence
this now houses Lawyers' offices
[third house on the block from the main house, the Blucher House]
I love the Widow's Walk --I'm sure, if up there physically, you could see over the park's trees all the way to the sea.










This house is situated between the two shown above
Again, part of the Blucher Family homes from the late 1800s/early 1900s
This particular home is now also a business office.











...and the park across the street....there is a small natural brook [running water only when and after it rains], trees galore, flowering bushes, a small bridge that crosses the water to another hilly area, pathways meandering beneath the trees' canopies, fountains and birdbaths for the many many year 'round feathered residents and for the migrating birds. Naturally, it's a birders paradise most times of the year. You could go every day of the week and see several different species. There is one aspect that isn't quite something that a tourist brochure would add to this description...but, I will. The downfall of this park, being that it's near the center of town, there is evidence of quite a lot of transient use also.The city tries to keep it cleaned, but if you go certain times of day...the evidence stares right back at you. You can also see a lot of plastic bottles and paper bags, etc. The next image to the left is that of a part of one of the watering fountains that have just a trickle of water [enlarge the photo if need be]...all, again, one of the many attractions for the bird life found in the area. When we've been around this particular fountain a few times, we've only seen the grackles and doves making use of it. Most other birds find it more attractive to them by the natural flow of the rainfall in the tree-lined 'brook'. The shadows and the water situated below the trees' branches are probably more a protected area for some.





....then, the bird life:


left to right: Northern Mockingbird, Wilson's Warbler, Starling



PS...this past weekend, it was balmy and quite damp from an earlier rain. In one of the areas that I like to call a 'hollow'...I enjoyed watching the flitting around of one particular Eastern Phoebe. The photos I got of its activity is posted on my bird photography blog - I'd Rather B Birdin-....which, by the way, the link should open in a new window.



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30 comments :

  1. I've never photographed a Mockingbird, but I want to!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...they're seen everywhere here in Texas....hope you get a chance to photograph one soon.

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  2. Such a beautiful old house! Looks like a great place for a B&B!! I know I'd enjoy staying there! AND terrific shadows for today! Hope your weekend is going well, Anni! Enjoy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...well, every time I'm near this B&B it seems to always be full of guests.

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  3. The house is gorgeous, what a great place for a B&B. I would love to stay there sometime. Great shots of the birds.
    Happy Weekend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...I'm sure they'd love having you to be their guest.

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  4. Beautiful houses, beautiful scenery, and beautiful birds. Life doesn't get much better than that, does it, Anni?
    K

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    Replies
    1. ...the lane is called easy street. :o)

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  5. Those historical homes are so grand and impressive! Beautiful! Enjoyed this informative walk with you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...glad to know you came along on the little jaunt around the park.

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  6. Hi there - makes me wonder what kind if signs they will put up in streets in the future! Here lived a famous blogger??

    Thanks for the comment on my blog - I've been in Oman for a week hence slow reply!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Australia

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    Replies
    1. Hi Stewart....no problem....life gets in the way of blogging sometimes!!! That, I totally understand.

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  7. Every one of these houses are quite special - big, but modest...stylish without being ostentatious..and I like those verandas on all three,,probably what your CC tropical climate required before A/C. Interesting that with a Spanish name it was a German that developed the birders paradise. Neat post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...and the street that this park is situated is also of Spanish Origin...

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  8. Those house are gorgeous!

    Shadowy Hemp Hearts
    Have a blessed Sunday.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...thanks Rose. I'm on my way........

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  9. Those are great shots-I especially am fond of the one with the big tree. What a magnificent shadow i cast!

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    Replies
    1. I love the tree [mesquite tree] too.

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  10. The Bluchers knew how to build nice houses. And you know how to capture birds :-)

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  11. Nice history lesson, great photos. I love the Corpus Christi area.

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    1. I think old Felix would be pleased to see his stately home featured on the Web!

      Shadows of Silence

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  12. thank you for the tour anni, i am especially fond of the five pic of the tree!!!

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    Replies
    1. ...there are so many trees, beautiful trees [this was a mesquite] in this city!!

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  13. What a beautiful park to have close to downtown and the houses, they just do not build them like that anymore!

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  14. Looks like a beautiful place. That B&B is gorgeous... I love seeing the cupolas (widow's walk) on top... Wonder if the female stood up there watching for her sailor to come home?????? Hope she didn't turn out to be a widow!!!! ha

    Love seeing those huge Live Oak trees. We enjoy seeing them in FL and also on the GA coast at St. Simon's ... Beautiful!!!

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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    Replies
    1. I have always heard them as widow's walks. Cupolas are different all together, aren't they? I like the way you think...I can just picture a young lady searching the vast sea for her sailor's return.

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  15. What a beautiful old someplace. The yard is wonderful as are all of the shadows. All three homes are so vintage looking and inviting. Nice captures. genie

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