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Got a good reason For taking the easy way out


...Way down yonder

As you may know if you visit with me often, our yard is heavily filled with the blossoms of different colored hibiscus plants. I like them 'cause they bloom from Spring to late Autumn. We have a couple of the variegated leaf variety that gives a whole 'nother 'splash of color' for their white and green and maroon color 'dappled' leaves!! The blossoms are much smaller than most because of them being hybrids, but the blossom and the leaf contrast makes for interesting pattern break in the gardens. And the morning shadows are always distinctive and 'colorful'.


CONNECTING TO:


SUNDAY'S SUMMARY

This week, as you well know also, the drought continues. But you wouldn't know it because of the weed population!! For some reason, they thrive in the inferno. So, early in the morning hours when the temps are still in the mid 70s, we went out a couple of days and did some yard work, pulling weeds. At Hobby Lobby this past week, I found four yard stakes at 66% off; they'd fit well in the scheme of things for my cheap bird seed feeders I found at Wal Mart for less than a dollar a piece. And the sparrows are having a hay-day, lovin' the fact that they're about the only bird that'll fit on the perches. Most times, when I fill the LARGE feeder with seed, the doves tend to get more than the sparrows. So this'll work out super, the many doves we have just can't sit on the perch and make gluttons of themselves --they can only get the fall-out left on the ground by the smaller species of birds!! Anyway, I bought four stakes and four feeders and placed them in the lawn in our back yard; grouped together. Out of boredom having to sit inside, we both decided to make a short trip to the bookstore. I finally broke down and bought Mein Kampf. Hitler's autobiography that has been translated from German to English. I'm finding the book I'm reading right now, Promised Lands, about the Texas Revolution a bit boring...well, not boring, just not catching my interest for the time being, and in the back of my mind, I am anxious to begin the autobiography. So, I'll probably begin reading Mein Kampf instead. While waiting for Bud to pick out his books to buy, I sat down in Starbucks coffee shop in the bookstore and read the first chapter...I think I'm gonna be hooked. Had to buy it and bring it home to finish what I started at the store. They're strategy of having a coffee shop within the bookstore works!!! Another day, we just hopped in the car and drove. Heading we knew not where...just to get out of the house. We ended up driving along highway 44 with a lot of countryside and farms up to the town of Alice, Texas. We didn't have much intentions of getting out of the car...just to drive....but we ended up stopping at the antique shoppes in the small town. I only found a carnival glass vase that was of the same 'color' I already have a few of at home... [this specific glass is the kind that looks like it has 'oil' mixed in to the colors---from clear, to orange, reds, greens, pinks, and purple colored glass. I've even seen black carnival glass too]. I doubt seriously if the vase I bought is truly 'antique', but it was too pretty to pass up and the price was right. It'll look nice after I clean it up and put it out on the dining room hutch with my other carnival glass bowls. ALICE TEXAS is so named for the daughter of the cattle baron of King's Ranch, one of the largest cattle ranches of the world. At one time, the ranch itself contained over 1 million acres. [At one time, it was the 3rd largest ---during the same era, XIT - "Ten in Texas" was the largest... with over 3 million acres up in the panhandle of Texas]. King Ranch is still in existence and is a co-op, and remains the largest operative ranch in the world]. Alice King was the only daughter to Capt. Richard King...she was married to a state senator, Kleberg...which Texas has a county named after him. A little bit more history of the little spot in Texas...The City of Alice was known for its large cattle industry until the discovery of oil and petroleum beneath Alice in the 1940s which caused a slight population boom. In 1948, an incident involving Lyndon B. Johnson's bid for the U.S. Senate took place at Alice's Precinct 13 where 202 ballots were cast in alphabetical order and all just at the close of polling in favor of Johnson. Johnson won the election against Coke Stevenson by 87 votes. Today, it's mostly farm land with cotton and sorghum fields all over!!! Beautiful old farm houses along the highways and cotton gins...here and there an oil pump can be seen. The cotton was beginning to 'pop' open [some fields were harvested already]. I took a few photos as we pulled off onto the shoulder of the highway...of cotton---

close up of cotton balls

'nother close up

part of the cotton crop vision of the vast field

Also, yesterday and then on Monday of this week, I received some news and more leads on my genealogy project. I found out that my Brother in Law's maternal ancestors...one was in the Virginia Militia during the war of 1812! I love finding this stuff. Especially when I am 99% positive my BIL knows nothing of this...I am secretly hoping that this will be a gift for him come Christmastime when they pay us a visit if all our plans go accordingly!!! The other lead I received was a cemetery search with success. I do need to get myself geared and purchase some CDs to get things rolling on getting the book published for them. Lots o' work ahead for me. Need to begin thinking of a book cover also, and get the graphic designed. The evenings this week we've spent a few hours at the TV watching the mini-series from the late 70s....Centennial. We'll watch the conclusion of the 18 episodes tonight.


[photo of Alice King Kleberg - online source, not my image and no infringement intended]




38 comments :

  1. That would be such a nice gift for your BIL!
    I love the pictures of the cotton. It's not something we ever see around here, and I find it so interesting.

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    1. Mari....what really threw ME for a loop was to see cotton growing in fields just outside Tucson, between there and Casa Grande, Arizona. I did not KNOW it was a crop in the Sonoran Desert.

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  2. That's a great shot of a cotton field. It remind me the field of my grandparents in the Philippines.

    Great shot of the day.

    Happy SSS,
    /CC

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    1. ...as are your shadows CC!!! Care to share some of your homemade jams?

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  3. Great post that brought back a lot of memories. I picked many a big sack of cotton. That is one thing I am glad was in another generation.

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    1. ...I just bet you could tell us some grand stories of your youth when picking cotton!!!

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  4. Another intriguing post! The hibiscus is a stunning colour! And so love your photos of the cotton! That must have been an amazing sight seeing a field of fairy wings!

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    1. ...it is quite an awesome sight! I can't help but think of the work that was involved before machinery took over the picking tho.

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  5. Hibiscus seems perfectly suited to a humid and semi-tropical environ, Corpus Christi being s far down south for this growth. I'd find it a treasure if we could get an endless flowering of hibiscus up here in southern New England...

    I was in AZ in 1978, and found it quite odd that such a water intensive crop would be grown in the desert (with only the Colorado River to feed it, and the Salt River in PHX running dry in the summer. Perhaps it works but seems so counterintuitive in the desert!

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    1. ...exactly, it just didn't seem feasible to grow cotton in that area at all!!

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  6. I love hibiscus...any color! The cotton fields are a common sight around her - I love the blooms!

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    1. ...yep, the South is known for its cotton fields.

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  7. Oh, that would indeed be a great gift for your BIL, Anni! Wonderful captures for the day as always! Beautiful, colorful flower and I love the cotton balls!! Hope you're enjoying a great weekend!

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    1. well....I hope he likes it. I know my sister will. LOL

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  8. Your pictures are always so lovely.

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    1. ...golly, Denise, you make me blush sometimes with such sweet words.

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  9. Your flower shot is great, the flower has such amazing color. Your yard must be so pretty, as you always have the most amazing flower photos.
    The cotton field is an awesome shot too. That is one vast field of cotton. I would sure hate to have to be out there, especially in the heated temperatures we have been experiencing lately, filling a bag with cotton.
    Glad that your latest genealogy search is going well, you brother-in-law will love that gift I am sure.

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    1. ....and that was a 'small' field compared to some we drove past.

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  10. Oh wow, love that hibiscus! Have a blessed Sunday.

    Any advise and tips you could give to my shadow shot entry would be so much appreciated.

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    1. ...thanks Rose, I appreciate the positive feedback.

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  11. Very pretty hibiscus! We miss our flowers at home. Thanks for sharing yours. :)

    Happy Sunday,
    Lois

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    1. ....the quotation comes to mind..."There's no place like home"

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  12. West Texas is a large cotton growing area...and we have to beg borrow and steal rain enuf to water it. So many years, not enuf rain falls to produce good grades of cotton. Why in the world farmers want to plant cotton out here is a mystery to me. I worked for years in a cotton office and never did figure out why we didn't grown something that didn't need so much water. Mr. Sweet's dad was a cotton farmer....some yrs were good, more yrs were bad.

    I, on the other hand, would much rather raise beautiful flowers such as yours. :))
    xo bj

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    1. (((bj))) it's so good of you to come by and visit. I so agree with you on the cotton crops...it's been too dry here for the last few years also. And I have to agree with you on the flower crops too. I'd much prefer that.

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  13. Love your hibiscus shot! As well, the info on the cotton was intersting. I have been searching my family tree in fits and starts - now it's my brother's turn. It is always fascinating to see where your roots began.

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    1. Oh yes....I agree, genealogy can be quite addictive. And the job is never ending, you can always find more as the years roll by.

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  14. I know that thing of getting in the car and going, just to get out of the house. You have actually been pretty busy, it seems. And hibiscus is one of my favorite flowers. We don't have many here, actually, like none!

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    1. ...me too....those hibiscus comes in so many colors these days it's well worth having them if they can thrive.

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  15. I am envious of your hibiscus!

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    1. ...well, come on over and I'll share 'em with you anytime.

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  16. Anni, I love your hibiscus. Unfortunately, I had to leave mine behind when we left the old house. We moved in the fall and I knew it wouldn't do well. The blooms were as big as a dinner plate and both Dwight and I loved it. Here, we didn't plant anything because we're not sure how long she will let us stay. We will know after the first of the month if we are moving or if the lease will be renewed.

    Love the history of Alice and the King Ranch. I really want to visit it someday. Dad worked there as a teen. The cotton photos are wonderful. Love visiting the South when the cotton is in bloom.

    Drop over to the Writing Nook if you have time. I have some wonderful news posted there.

    Blessings,
    Mary

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    1. Mary!! It's great to see you...I'm on my way over.

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  17. That sounds like fun, just getting in the car and driving with no particular destination in mind. I'm quite certain though that if I were to try and do that with my husband the entire trip would be filled with conversation regarding the high price of gas and how we were wasting it :)

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    1. ....waste not, want not in other words huh? Well, my response to something like that way of thinking would be, the high price of gas only evaporates in the tank if you don't use it.

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  18. I've never seen any hibiscus with variegated leaves around here. Of course, here hibiscus is an annual ... is it a perennial for you? We visited the King Ranch when we vacationed in Texas back in 1970. I'm sure that much has changed in that much time.

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    1. ...oh yes, I know for a fact that the whole 'culture' of the ranch has changed in the last 40 years. I saw it as a kid and then when our kids were young, between then and now...the system has changed, but the history really hasn't all that much.

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  19. Hi Anni....you should give garden tours or better still make a video of you walking around your yard!! MOL Mom is really good a suggesting things that do not involve her.

    Seeing cotton grow is just amazing. It is grown some down East in NC near the coast.
    hugs madi and Mom
    PS
    Mom has come up with a good TTS this week...it is in honor of the upcoming Blogville and Cat Blogosphere Olympics
    Just saying............

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    1. ....wow, you do good work....I haven't even thought of a song yet.

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