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Got a good reason For taking the easy way out




Sufferin' Succotach....

Don't mind me....I couldn't come up with a good blog title, so the first thing that came to my mind was Sufferin' Succotach.... I wanted to combine my macro image along with the Monday Morsels today since time is an issue in posting this morning. In Tucson, we had five olive trees [real olives] in our back yard along the stone wall. Of course I never took the time to pick them, and soak them in the special brine to make my own canned olives. I had too much fun watching birds devour them when the growing season ended and they turned their deep olive purple/black [the olives, not the birds *wink]. Oftentimes since we've relocated to Texas, I 'kick' myself for not at least once trying to can my own. Being that my father was the 'horticulturist' in the family with his acreage of fruit trees, grapevines, and garden of corn, onions, peas, green beans, tomatoes and experimenting with 'don't grow in Colorado' veggies and fruits, my mom had to be the devoted homemaker and can stuff. [by the way, my dad had a root cellar of cinder blocks built on his property for a year 'round temp] My mom did a lot of canning of peaches and cherries and applesauce, making raspberry, strawberry, and grape jellies and preserves in her day, and I inherited all her canning equipment - after watching her and helping her through my years as a teen, I do know how to can...but, in the back of my mind, I always have [still today] the fear of not doing it correctly and then......botulism. Now freezing, I like to do it. LOL Anyway, while on one of our many walking expeditions on the trails, I came upon this flowering bush. I had absolutely NO IDEA what it was. And if it weren't for another day's hiking on another trail, I spied the sign below another tree of the same blossom....now I know. It's a Mexican Wild Olive!!!







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28 comments :

  1. Oh my gosh,this is all an olive tree? It is beautiful, I have never seen one! Have you just picked and eaten an olive?

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    1. Ginny....these photos are NOT the olives you see in a jar on the store shelves. But the ones we had in Tucson were. Thing is....Raw olives contain an extremely bitter substance called oleuropein. They are inedible to all but the most stubborn raw foodists. Brining olives removes the oleuropein, as does pressing them into oil. You must soak them before enjoying them full flavored without the extreme bitterness!!!!

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  2. Interesting lesson today, Anni! I had a Russian Olive tree, given to me by my dad, at my last home...but it was decorative only. Wonderful smelling blossoms, but no fruit. I have never figured out why they called it a Russian Olive...but then there are many things in this universe I don't understand! Those are beautiful blooms on this wild olive anyway!

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    1. Oh I know those Russian Olive trees....silvery leaves and yellow blossoms. I read somewhere where they are trying to make it mandatory to cut them out, and/or ban them being planted. [In my day, they made a good wind break].

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  3. These photos are gorgeous!

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    1. Thanks FTH....glad you stopped by today.

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  4. What a beautiful flower! We have Russian Olives that Linda spoke of and they smell wonderful, but the flowers aren't nearly as pretty!

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    1. Oh Mari....I really enjoyed YOUR post today.

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  5. Fantastic set of photos. Love the second one of the olives as it's something we don't see where I live.

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    1. they're wild, not the edible ones.

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  6. Those are really beautiful flowers. I'm glad you were able to figure out what they are, and so easily too. I don't think I've ever seen olives on the trees before, Anni. You are educating me! :-)

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    1. ...just realize that these are NOT the olives you see, canned on your grocer's shelves. These 'olives' are very large, cream colored and much more round than the edible olives.

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  7. Die kannte ich bislang auch nicht.
    Die Blüten sind wunderschön, aber auch die Früchte sind sehr fotogen.

    LG Mathilda

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    1. ...now you know. Yes, the flowers are very pretty aren't they? Thanks 'Tilda.

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  8. How gorgeous. At first I thought I was looking at a white hibiscus.

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    1. Now that you mention it...you're so right. It DOES look like a hibiscus blossom.

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  9. Well a Mexican Wild Olive by any other name would be just a lovely.
    Certainly one I'm not familiar with either. I guess the 0live part of the name come from the bud being olive shaped? It kind of looks like a Morning Glory.
    Hugs Madi and Mom

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    1. Ya, that too...a morning glory.

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  10. I so love to come over here and learn something new:-) I realize that the Mexican Wild Olive is not the type you find in the grocery store but still so interesting. Just love the blooms on it! I've never cared for olives, just find them too salty. I'll never forget the time when a friend of mine was trying to diet and for a snack he decided to have a few olives because he didn't like them very much and figured it would stop him from eating too much. He ended up loving them and would eat the whole jar! lol xoxo

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    1. I love olives...ripe and pimento stuffed green ones. I ate so many one time, I got sick. But it's never deterred my cravings in the least.

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  11. Thinks for the info on olives, Anni! Coming from Holland, we don't know much about olives, since they need a warm climate. The very salty Greek Kalamate olives are my favorite!

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    1. I don't think I've ever had a Greek Olive in my entire life.

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  12. oooh, home grown olives. That sounds pretty good to me. :)

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    1. I know...wish I would've tried making some of my own.

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  13. I love your post title , I was not quite so creative lol! Love the great pics ! I did some canning & freezing when I was younger . You must have enjoyed all that garden food freshness when you were younger.

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  14. I had no idea that an olive tree was so pretty. I think I would prefer to watch the birds enjoy the olives since I can't stand the taste of them.

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  15. Beautiful flowers. Interesting as I never heard of Wild Olives..

    Visiting for MYM- hope you can stop by:)

    http://www.sweethomephilippines.com/2012/06/road-trip-state-college.html

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