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Got a good reason For taking the easy way out


Only in Texas...a ghost town that doesn't exist?


    Founded in 1839, Lamar was a rival to the then thriving Aransas City, Texas which was just across Copano Bay at Lookout Point. Aransas City had the customhouse which guaranteed prosperity. Lamar became the first coastal town in (what was then) Refugio County.   The President of the Republic was petitioned by a group of settlers to move the customhouse from Aransas City. Their forceful argument that the new town was twice the population of Aransas City convinced the President - who just happened to share the same name of the town. The change was made and the worse fears of Aransas Citizens became a reality. Aransas City virtually disappeared.  Lamar's star rose and its prosperity surpassed that of its former rival - that is until the town was destroyed by Union forces during the Civil War. Only a few shellcrete foundations remained.  Lamar found itself in Aransas County when that county was established in 1871.



...in continuing the day trip, this post is all about the Lamar Cemetery on Goose Island.   As I stated in my post yesterday on our day trip saga, the town of Lamar Texas is proclaimed to be a 'ghost town'...no longer in existence by any Census taking, nor do they have any 'government-run facilities'. Yet, for a fact, there are more living in Lamar than in any time...only 'cause most homes are occupied by Winter Texans, and are not considered citizens as such, because their 'permanent' residence records are outside the state of Texas --most of them. The images I took of the cemetery [some catching my eye for the historical names I've read in previous readings and researching] will be shared, first, in a mosaic/collage formation---



The gate carving reads:  Est. in the year of our Lord 1854


The embedded Historical Marker Inscription reads: This burial ground originally served pioneer settlers of the Lamar community. Founded by James W. Byrne (d. 1865), a native of Ireland and a veteran of the Texas Revolution, it was named for his friend Mirabeau B. Lamar, former President of the Republic of Texas. The earliest grave is that of Patrick O’Connor (1822 – 54), a bookkeeper for Byrne’s business operations in New Orleans. The town of Lamar ceased to exist by 1915 and the cemetery was neglected until the 1940s when it was restored through efforts by the family of John Henry Kroeger, Jr. (d. 1944)


After returning home, I got online and did a little 'digging' myself. Seems the one image I took of the BYRNE headstone is related to the founder of the Stella Maris Chapel, James W. Byrne !! S [Samuel] Harold Byrne is kin of the 'founder'...family originally from Wicklow County Ireland ---few died in and around Lamar/Refugio Texas. And more digging resulted in my curiosity proving correct in assuming that the L.A. Wells [part of a duo headstone] is indeed Lydia Ann ---the woman for whom the Lydia Ann Lighthouse is named. The very lighthouse that I returned to, to better photograph, near the ferry at Port Aransas, posted about Link HERE.

...indiviual, larger images of cemetery---








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Then, on a 'brighter note'...this photo, found below the text here, is of a coral bean bush in full bloom. Taken along the pathway of one of our inner-city birding trails! Notice the insect? I didn't 'til I uploaded the image off the camera photo card to add my watermark!! LOL










[I posted about the chapel yesterday on my Monday Morsels
-->Stella Maris Chapel <--link here].











CONNECTING TO:

ALSO: for this post, I'm linking to TAPHOPHILE TUESDAY
Picstory's next topic is *self portrait*

50 comments :

  1. This is a very unique and colorful cemetery. I love the little wrought iron fence around that one grave. Wow to the brilliant Coral Bean Bush, does it really grow beans? If so, I bet they would be poison. Bright colors often warn of poison.

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    1. Yes, they do have seed pods...and I'm with you...pretty sure they're not edible.

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  2. What a beautiful place to wander around. I find old cemeteries so interesting. That bean bush is gorgeous!

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    1. Me too....tho, I don't get to have time to stop at all of 'em...they ARE interesting to visit.

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  3. Intriguing place! I am surprised to see a blue toned headstone! I don't think I have ever seen one! I know Julie at Taphophile Tragics would love you to link up to her meme about cemeteries! It runs every Tuesday!
    And a beautiful rich red plant!

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    1. Thanks for the heads up on the meme...I linked.

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  4. Very interesting post! I enjoy the really old cemeteries too - so much to read and wonder about! Love that coral bean!

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    1. If you're anything like me, you tend to think how they lived, what caused their death...what their 'world' was like.

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  5. I think I'm a bit weird, but I really like walking around old cemeteries. I find them interesting. I like seeing the headstones. They come in a wide variety from plain and simple to ornate and grandiose. Interesting post. I do like the uniqueness of the blue headstone.

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    1. Me too. I just wish I could follow them and stop at all of them.

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  6. Beautiful collage you have made.
    Wishing you a good day.
    Hanne Bente / hbt.finus.dk

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    1. Thanks...hope your day is brilliant and filled with sunshine.

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  7. A very interesting cemetery. I'd love to walk around in there, but I've just done the next best thing: joined YOU on a virtual tour. Thanks, Anni!

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    1. I like to learn of the locals and their history like the one about the lighthouse.

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  8. What an interesting post and your photos are beautiful.
    I love the color in that bush. I really had to look for that insect.
    Thanks for sharing TX with us.
    Hugs

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    1. Hi Sharon...glad you enjoyed...whatcha been up to these days?

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  9. We have found some very interesting cemeteries in Texas. We stopped a couple of times at Nachadoches and wandered through the old cemetery there taking pictures. So much history there!

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    1. I like walking through them...no matter what state. LOL

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  10. Very neat cemetery!

    My Rubies, have a fabulous Tuesday!

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    1. Hope you have a great day too Rose.

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  11. thanks for sharing this interesting story with beautiful collage with us :)

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  12. It is weirdly exciting to find the grave of someone whose name features so prominently in the area. Lydia Ann's stone is so simple, yet she has a lighthouse as a memorial also!. It is also interesting that both of the Wells died in the same month of their birth.

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    1. ...well, I wasn't sure about Lydia Ann [being that the headstone had L.A....but I recalled the 'Wells' last name and associated it with what I've read and it all made me research it.

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  13. Love the red flowers. Happy RT2!

    Mine's here.

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    1. They're fascinating...and such a vivid, deep, rich red.

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  14. Anni to me that was a beautiful cemetery. The headstones so pretty and the gate I just loved that. Good to see it in such good condition.
    Hugs C

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    1. I wish we could've stayed longer and walked around more, but the mosquitoes were having a FEAST!!

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  15. Hm.. a different way to visit a funeral ground
    Thanks

    http://www.starbear.no/mormor/2012/05/07/tinas-picstory-49/

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    1. Hope you enjoyed the little 'tour'

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  16. The old cemeteries are a font of information and history. These persons would be lost to history without these simple but ornate markers to let us know them, if only a briefly. The mix of young and old lives are wonderful, the look at life that the winter dwellers give no notice. A great mosaic!

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  17. Those older cemeteries can be fascinating. How interesting about the town also.

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    1. The mention of 'ghost town' and more people residing there than ever before seemed odd to me.

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  18. These stones, at least the ones you chose to show, are in excellent condition and so easy to read considering their age.

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    1. Hamilton? I can't find any link to leave you a comment. So, thanks for stopping by, and I wanted to add, I liked reading the history of your headstone share yesterday.

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  19. Coral bean bush? My goodness! If those grew in my area, I would visit them daily and let myself be dazzled by their scarlet beauty!

    Shriveled Red Cactus Fruit

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    1. ...they don't bloom long, but when they do it's like they're on 'fire'.

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  20. What a fantastic post and gorgeous pictures!

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  21. Very interesting post, Anni, complemented by wonderful photos!

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  22. cool and unique.. =_) visiting from 366 BPC

    http://www.lovehomegrowgarden.info/2012/05/08/my-parents-dining-set/

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  23. i like the bird on that byrne stone!

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  24. Welcome to Taphophile Tragics, Anni. I am so pleased that Gemma encouraged you to link up.

    One of the things that I really like about cemeteries and graveyards is that there is so much information online to discover given a careful choice of search terms. Some of the info you have here is just wonderful, as are your photographs.

    Thank you so much for your contribution.

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    1. That's always nice to read Denise. Glad you enjoyed.

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