my POETRY | ANNI'S BOOK CRITIQUES | my ART | my BIRD photography | MLB | NFL | hurricanes



Got a good reason For taking the easy way out


One morning this past week, early, Bud and I walked the mile and a half stretch between Indian Point Park and Sunset Lake Park, just between the North Shore Beach and Corpus Christi Bay and Portland, Texas. Look back and you can see the Harbor Bridge and Corpus Christi's skyline; ahead, just opposite, Portland's outskirts of the town. Off our right shoulders the ponds and then the Gulf of Mexico near the horizon. To our left, more bay area waters and on the horizon you can see on a clear day the wind turbines along Portland's boundaries. Of course, the freeway that interlinks Corpus and Portland juts in between the ponds/Gulf and the other side where the extending bay waters rest. It's a beautiful area...filled with ponds, tidal basins, a lot of juniper ---oyster beds, fish and of course, water fowl!! On this particular morning, the sun was shining brightly, the water sparkled like diamond dust, and the birds were busy trying to fill their bellies with the 'catch of the day'!! Quite a few joggers, bikers, and photograph enthusiasts were out and about along with us. We walked the mile plus long blacktopped strip one way...stopping here and there to view from the observation decks provided for us birders. We saw many, many different species. At the end of the walking trail, we chatted with another lady who told us where to look for Roseate Spoonbills that she had spotted. Turning around to head back, Bud and I spotted an historical marker that was alongside the path among the juniper bushes. This is what we read---

The historical marker states, as follows:
Site of
INDIAN POINT MASS GRAVE OF 1919 HURRICANE VICTIMS
    In the early morning hours of Sunday, September 14, 1919, a hurricane made landfall in Corpus Christi after gathering strength in the Gulf of Mexico for two weeks.  Crowds packed the North Beach Area for their last weekend of the summer season, most continuing to ignore the last minute evacuation warnings of police officers, firefighters and soldiers from Fort Brown.  The rapidly rising water blocked vacationers from escaping to higher ground.  As the water rose, people climbed to their rooftops and tied ropes to themselves and their children so that they might not be lost. A giant wave of water carrying oil from ruptured tanks on Harbor Island, timber from Port Aransas and cotton bales from a dock in Corpus Christi crashed down on North Beach, sweeping its victims into the black waters of Nueces Bay.  On Monday morning the sun rose on a scene of terrible destruction.  Though the official death tolls was 284, estimates place the actual number, including those lost at sea, at one thousand.  In the ensuing days, the survivors worked together to rebuild their homes, rescue the injured and bury the dead in mass graves, some containing more thank fifty bodies, using farm implements as undertaking tools.  A month later the bodies were removed to Rose Hill Cemetery in Corpus Christi and other sites as requested by friends and family members.  Property damage and crop losses were estimated at twenty million dollars.  The great storm of 1919 was the worst disaster to hit Corpus Christi in the twentieth century.  The mass graves at Indian Point were about one hundred yards east of this site.






[this last photo is an estimation of 100 yards east from the historical marker, approximately where the mass grave site was located]





I POSTED ANOTHER WEDNESDAY POST TODAY...below this one, for Wordless Wednesday.




CONNECTING TO:







32 comments :

  1. You're really going to fall off your chair when you see your #1 commenter today! It's almost 3 am and I can't sleep (snoring issues in the other room - no amount of poking and groaning (me) has helped!)

    Beautiful walk you had, and lovely views. But what a sad story about the victims - and how frustrating to hear that they had a chance to escape but didn't listen. Takes me back to the Big Thompson flood when folks at the Riverview Campground were warned around 11 pm, but were tucked away in their tents and sleeping bags and were certain it would never happen to them. Great sermon fodder for many weeks!

    Re your comments on my much-delayed recent post. I am thinking I will probably post some flowers with little to no narrative - none needed!

    As for the fire - yes, it was really sad up there in the Poudre area. It is finally out, and I haven't seen anything yet, but the smoke was really bad down here - one morning it was thick in our front yard. As it turned out, the guy who was responsible was someone I knew from my years at CSU - one of our MSW graduates from a little before my time there, but he worked in the counseling department, so we worked with him as an intern supervisor for our students. He was following all the rules, using a camp stove, not an open fire, and the wind somehow took his fire and started the whole mess. The one stupid thing he did was, after trying to call and not having a signal, he went home and didn't report it for over a day. He's been charged a very small fine, but may be billed for the fight.

    Have a great day and stay cool!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes....I so remember that flood!!! To be in our own yard, looking toward the canyon and those black clouds [literally BLACK!!] ---we knew it was coming. I think he should be billed for the damage control....that's only right. Too bad it happened tho. Yes....YES!!! Do post your photos of the iris.

      Delete
  2. Beautiful pictures - including the sunrise in the post below! What a tragedy that hurricane was - I can't imagine the terror as that oily wave hit, knowing that they were warned. Very sad.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So many times, people think they're not going to be 'the ones'....but history proves otherwise.

      Delete
  3. The photos were lovely, but what a sad story! When will people understand the fury that is possible from nature?! Seems we had a similar story not too long ago from New Orleans...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep....sad. And yes....people tend to ignore the warnings.

      Delete
  4. These are beautiful photos of your area. I've never been there of course, so it's nice to see the wonderful scenery. The story you related is so tragic and sad. Have a great day! Pamela

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for stepping into my blog parlor and leaving such a positive comment. I appreciate your words and your visit.

      Delete
  5. My mom was born in Nov. of 1919. Sad tragedy - those storms can be so powerful - but you never really know when they will reach that strength. It's a beautiful area now! Good morning. sandie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it's one of my favorite spots to go birding....especially in the morning with the sun dancing on the water.

      Delete
  6. I also had heard of this storm but now I know all about it. It is so sad that they could have escaped but didn't. In 1919, that number is equivalent to probably five times that number today, in terms of population in the area. Today, however, I think they would be forced to leave the area, right?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, the city usually states evacuation is MANDATORY...but there are always die-hards that remain in their homes. Guess forcing some one to leave isn't all that feasible sometimes. Who knows.

      Delete
  7. Anni you and Bud have some of the most amazing places for strolling. Thank you for sharing them and your Wordless Wednesday is National Geographic Quality.
    Hugs Madi and Mom

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh my gosh....M&M, your words make me blush!! Thanks for the kind words and encouragement.

      Delete
  8. beautiful photos but what a sad story.
    i can't imagine the terror of those tragic moments.
    so sad..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mother Nature can have its 'sore spots'...not only hurricanes, but blizzards, avalanches, tsunamis, earthquakes.....but the area, right now, is gorgeous.

      Delete
  9. Such a tragic loss. I have family near Beaumont and always get a bit nervous when a hurricane is headed their way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes....during the hurricane Ike, I imagine Beaumont was affected.

      Delete
  10. How I'd love to be taking these walks with you, I don't often have the chance to walk along the sea shore. How sad what happened in 1919 when that hurricane hit and so many people died. I just can't get over some people, how they just don't take precautions even when told a bad storm is coming!! If I was told to evacuate, you darn right I would be evacuating! lol Loved all of your beautiful pictures:-) xoxo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love this place Pea...you should come down here and enjoy some time with us.

      Delete
  11. Your post below is beautiful with the buttermilk clouds and the sun on the water. I love your beautiful pictures of the birds and the water. I have never seen a memorial like this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's really not a memorial....it's more or less a 'highway' historical marker like all states have.

      Delete
  12. Beautiful shots. So sad that there was such a tragic ending to the hurricane in 1919. We've certainly come a long way in terms of being prepared for weather related issues

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, we have come a long way....but thing is, there are those that'll think they're not going to be affected.

      Delete
  13. Is that the same year that Galveston was hit by that massive hurricane? Was it the same storm? Or do I have the year wrong? What a sad event. Nic pics Anni.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I do believe it was the very same hurricane that hit Galveston also.

      Delete
  14. Thanks for letting me trail along.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's always a pleasure to have you visit with me "St. Nick"!!!!

      Delete
  15. Great photos! The view is amazing now a midst of what happened to the past. Thanks for joining Water World Wednesday

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it is a most beautiful, tranquil area just outside the city.

      Delete
  16. Would love to go walking with you my friend.

    ReplyDelete

.