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Got a good reason For taking the easy way out


Little House on the 'prairie'


....aka One Room School and D is for Desk...



Nuecestown School circa 1892-


Way north and west of the bustle of the city, about 15 miles from home, there is a birding/exercising trail to be walked. It's all part of a "Hilltop Community". Driving the long distance, around the city, over the interstate highway toward San Antonio and then backtracking into the NW area of the city [to avoid a slew of traffic lights and gazillion intersections]...Bud and I traversed the area over the past weekend. It was a hot, sultry morning and the vast overgrowth of trees and observation decks were a haven to rest and search for birds. We found no birds worthy of photographing [most were just flitting from tree to tree], but we still enjoyed the area. Across the highway, there is an old-town cemetery that Bud and I walked around several months ago [here is a LINK to view a slideshow I posted of the old cemetery]...I think it was two Halloweens ago since we love walking around historical cemeteries in October. LOL Anyway, we haven't been to this trail yet. And we found out we were missing out on some pretty territory. We will return again and again. This particular time, it was crowded with family activity...picnic and BBQ pits abound before you enter the trail, and they were becoming quite filled up - the lack of birds is probably that reason...they were loud and boisterous so the birds remained 'hidden'. The wild flowers along an open area were beautiful...the thick, dense greenery was a welcome sight. The winding trail was a vigorous walk for a while in the thick humidity with the hills...but we did get a good work out since we're both so used to walking along the seashore and flat land.

After we completed the entire trail walk [link to photos of the trail], we came out at the opposite end we began. Here is where *the oldest surviving school* is preserved and a well-kept secret. There is a complex of dance schools that are adjacent to the area and there were young girls attending classes and trials for the day. As we approached the State Historical Marker for the school, we were invited to go inside the school by the dance instructor who had the key to unlock the building. Normally it is NOT open to the public. We were lucky enough to be there at the right time I guess, either that or she thought that we may be tourists from out of town since I was toting my camera in case of a bird sighting [LOL]; who knows. But when asked if we'd like to see inside, I jumped at the chance and followed her inside. I was amazed at the quality and preservation...


From the Texas Online Handbook, history of the community is sparse, but this I share with you.
    NUECESTOWN, TEXAS. Nuecestown was originally about thirteen miles northwest of Corpus Christi in Nueces County. In 1989 what remained was located in the 11400 block of Leopard St. in Corpus Christi. The town was established in 1852 and called the Motts by English and German settlers, in reference to clusters of trees in the area. Later the community was renamed after the Nueces River. Henry Kinney, the founder, required that each settler purchase 100 acres at a dollar an acre and a minimum of ten cows at ten dollars a head. By 1859 a post office had been established in the community; a temporary post office had existed in 1854–55. The town was raided in the Nuecestown Raid by Mexican bandits on March 26, 1875. [137 years ago last Monday, the 26th]

    *By 1885 Nuecestown had one of the largest schools in the county, with thirty-two students enrolled. The schoolhouse of 1892, constructed after the first two burned, is one of the few surviving structures of Nuecestown.* In its prime the town had a stagecoach inn, a public ferry, a meat-packing plant, a cotton gin, a general store, and a blacksmith shop. The community declined after being bypassed by the St. Louis, Brownsville, and Mexico Railway in 1905. In 1896 the population was about 200, and Nuecestown had daily mail service. By 1927 the post office had closed, and the townsite was the at center of the Turkey Creek oilfield and had a population of fifty. In the 1960s all that was left of Nuecestown was a Motts Restaurant and curio shop run by Jim Wright. In 1980 all that remained was the preserved schoolhouse of 1892 and the Nuecestown Cemetery, both located within the Corpus Christi city limits.

To follow along with Tina's Picstory challenge for the week, she suggested it be about the letter "D"....hence, desks. The original school desks, inside the one room school, of the 1890s era in Nuecestown Texas...



Reminds me of the old TV program LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE




FURTHER READING: The Nuecestown Mexican Raid of 1875 [mentioned above]

And on a side note...why else would a town go defunct with a name like Nuecestown....nueces in Spanish is 'nut'....Nut town? [sorry, I couldn't help myself] Of course, according to this site, if you capitalize nueces to Nueces...its literal translation is WALnuts...but still-----








CONNECTING TO:

next week Picstory challenge: Fruits

39 comments :

  1. This is so cool, and you even went inside!!! It is still beautifully kept. Phil went to a one room schoolhouse.

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    1. As I mentioned below, I think I would've liked going to school with a small atmosphere like this. Phil was lucky.

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  2. What a great building, and I love the old desks.

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    1. Me too....I wanted to see if I could fit in one, but the 'host' was gracious enough to unlock the school for me...I didn't want to push my luck.

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  3. It is always wonderful to be in the right place at the right time...I have been fortunate on several occasions to get a "special" viewing! This is a wonderful look back at the history of the area. I actually went to school in a 1 room school my first 2 years of school (yes, I am that old!)...by the time you get to 3rd grade, you know everything already because you have heard it all twice before!...

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    1. Oh boy.....your link doesn't take me to your profile any more...the new interface is going to take some getting used to I can see. LOL But after several attempts I finally found your blog links from the Google+ ----geez.

      Y'know I think you had an advantage going to a one room school. There is something about it all that feels and seems so appealing to me.

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  4. I love that you got to go inside! It's a treasure for sure. I feel like I stepped back in time, looking at your pictures.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed the step back in time Mari. Your 'time' post today was super too.

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  5. Hi Annie ~~ I think we all remember those type of desks. How nice you went inside. Old cemeteries are very interesting too, I agree
    There id a lot of history there. Enjoy your walking while you can
    my friend. Nice of you to drop by my blog and I am OK on the whole.
    My leg is better but the back still gives me pain. I got some more
    Ensure today, chemist delivered it. So I hope that helps get the B/P and weight up a bit. Thanks for caring my dear friend, Love and Hugs, Merle.

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    1. Glad you stopped in to visit Merle!! You must take care of yourself. It's important to us too you know. :-)

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  6. Hi Anni (is that your name?), I didn't go to a one room school but I DO remember those desks... I sat in many of them back in the late 40's/50's. (I'll be 70 in August.)

    That is neat that they did preserve that school house.. I love it... I'd also enjoy visiting the old cemetery.

    That walk sounds awesome.... We have so many steep hills around here --that it makes walking HARDER... ha

    Send me your email sometime (mine is betsyadams@mac.com) and I'll send you a picture of the Peppermint Stick tulip...

    We are headed out today on a little road-trip.
    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  7. I forgot to ask if you are on Facebook... I am and would love to catch up with you there also.
    Hugs,
    Betsy

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    1. No...I have a FB account and use it only when my daughter tells me to go out and view photos of our grandsons.

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  8. Oh what fun! An unexpected treasure!

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    1. Yes....what really surprised me the most was the coolness inside after it's always cooped up and closed/sealed shut.

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  9. I wonder if only the NAME of the town was nutty. What an interesting history lesson you gave here, Anni. I really enjoyed it, especially the picture of the old desks. I remember sitting in one that was similar long, long ago.

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    1. My aunt taught at a one room school house in Nebraska...this so reminded me of her. And yep, the desks are familiar.

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  10. sweet house and wonderful old desk´s :) thanks for sharing your D with us!

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    1. Thank you for hosting Tina.

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  11. I love day trips!! We might be taking a lot of those this spring/summer with gas prices so high. Nearly 4.00 a gal in NC.
    We have the highest gasoline tax in the south east.

    Great pictures
    Hugs Madi and Mom

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    1. Ummmm, ya-a....and diesel is even more so!!!

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  12. I love old schoolhouses! My friend in high school lived in a converted schoolhouse. The walls only went so far up and it really had that open concept feel, even with the walls. It was nice though.

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    1. Ohhhhhhhh, I think that would have all kinds of possibilities for a living space.

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  13. Fantastic preservation! I'd have jumped at the opportunity to go inside too!

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    1. Thanks Mani...errrr, Nani. {insert wink}

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  14. And for sure the students/pupils at those times did study well. ^_^


    You are invited to post your water photos here Water World Wednesday

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    1. Hi Kim....I have my watery photos ready to publish after midnight CTzone. Thanks for the invite.

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  15. Love the old school houses. The school I attended 1st through 3rd grade only had 3 class rooms. I had the same teacher 1-3 and we were all in the same room...Just 4 of us in my grade! 4th through 6th was in another room and special ed. had it's own room.

    I posted more about the pulled squash sandwich on my blog. Thought you might be interested!

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    1. Thank you thank you, thank you Cassie!!!! Much appreciated.

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  16. Something exciting about stepping back in time. I can just imagine the little kids who must have attended school there and the pranks the boys played on the girls...you are so fortunate to be close to such historical and natural surroundings!

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    1. I was truly in awe that the lady allowed me to go inside. I felt quite privileged.

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  17. Those Desks were in my school when I started. They were replaced rather quickly, but I remember them.
    Have a nice Day

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    1. I think our 'age' with most bloggers who visit with me, the majority, are remembering the same type desks.

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  18. That's very good. Still in good condition..

    Visiting for RT 2 - hope you can stop by:)

    http://www.sweetposh.info/2012/04/carmex-lip-balm.html

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    1. Yes, I did stop by your RT post. Thanks for the invite.

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  19. LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE: I like to watch a rerun of this lovely show.

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