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NEWS FLASH:
I NOW HAVE A BOOK PUBLISHED


Titled Wings Over My Texas
Description excerpt: A non-scientific photographic study of over 200 birds, common, rare, and vagrant birds, along the Coastal Bend of South Texas. Areas include Corpus Christi, Port A...
check out the book details on this linked site!!




Thursday 13 header made by me for my blog.

According to my labels list this is #42 edition


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Have you ever wondered what some editing notations mean - Abbreviations and/or symbols? Some, or all, you may know already.

Here are some examples:

1- "sic" [usually found in quoting some writing/type]
it means: Sic is a Latin word, originally sicut meaning "thus", "so", or "just as that". In writing, it is placed within square brackets and usually italicized—[sic]—to indicate that an incorrect or unusual spelling, phrase, punctuation, and/or other preceding quoted material has been reproduced verbatim from the quoted original and is not a transcription error.

2- "i.e."
it means: "that is". The abbreviation "i.e." comes from the Latin words "id est"

3- "e.g"
it means: "for example". It's short for Latin "exempli gratia", which means "example provided".

4- "etc."
it means: Latin for Et Cetera -so on and so forth

5- "HBO"
it means: A acronym for Home Box Office [cable television]

6- "zip" code
it means: Zone Improvement Plan [United States Postal Service]

7- * *==
it means: an emoticon representing the American Flag

8- "P. M."
it means: Latin for Post Meridiem -or- After Midday [behind hour/minutes]

9- "A. M."
it means: Latin for Ante Meridiem -or- Before Midday [behind hour/minutes]

10- ""
it means: In editing, to indent for a new paragraph. [technically called 'pilcrow sign']

11- "I ♥ NY"
it means: I LOVE New York [or anything behind the 'heart' means the same---"I love....."]

12- " lb."
it means: Latin for Libra [being a unit of measure -a pound-]

13- "p. s."
it means: Medieval Latin postscriptum [to write later]



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THIS IS A FAMILY FAVORITE--Begin Preparing EARLY in the morning---

I love lasagna! I love the shortened version I've come up with where I don't have to cook the noodles, nor purchase those nasty tasting noodles that are called "pre cooked" noodles! And every time, my version comes out even better than Italian restaurants. But of course, my taste preference is different. I don't care for ricotta nor do I like to use cottage cheese for a substitute. And I like it with a very light taste of Italian Seasoning...restaurant-style is too heavy on the herbs for my taste.

So I devised a simple, quick, recipe that is so tasty, even our son, who's a picky eater, asked me once how I make mine.

Absolutely no pre cooking involved.

I take a box of the regular lasagna noodles
and two cans of diced tomatoes [no salt added]
a can of tomato paste
1 lb. bag of shredded sharp cheddar cheese [I only use about half the bag]
1 lb. bag of shredded mozzarella cheese [whole bag]
1/3 cup freshly shredded Parmesan cheese
1 - 2 Tblsps. Italian Seasoning
1 Tblsp. ground garlic [or two cloves of fresh, minced]

In a blender, I blend the two cans of diced tomatoes and the can of tomato paste along with adding the garlic, the Parmesan cheese, and the Italian Seasoning. I use the 'chop' button, to keep the tomatoes coarsely chopped.

In a 9x13 glass pan, I pour enough tomato mix on the bottom of the pan to thinly cover the glass bottom. Layer it with the lasagna noodles and then a combination of the cheeses [use about 1/3 of the amount from above] lightly covering the noodles. I then add more tomato mix and cheese and noodles...continuing to layer the ingredients until I have four layers stopping with the sauce and cheese. Again, NO COOKING.





Cover it with tin foil and refrigerate for about 10 hours. [The noodles will soak up the tomato liquids and serve firm, but not pastey!] When you want to heat and serve, just cook it in a moderately hot oven, covered, until bubbly and hot. Remove the foil, and continue to bake until cheese is lightly browned.

Remove from oven, let set for about 10-15 minutes. Slice, serve.

* *

I always make a cucumber-frozen pea, onion and pimento salad, in a light Italian oil and vinegar dressing, served on a bed of chopped Romaine lettuce for a side dish. And hot garlic toast. The cucumber salad is just sliced cucumbers, onions, pimentos, frozen peas and tossed with a vinegar/oil dressing with dried parsley.

It's a great compliment to the lasagna dish.
Served well chilled and marinated for a couple of hours.

40 comments :

  1. Thanks for educating me on some of the weird little letter combos that make it into my world! Now I know what a zip is!

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  2. Very informative list!
    Happy tt!

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  3. Wow a great TT and a recipe! Thanks Anni!

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  4. Interesting list! Abbreviations can be very confusing.

    Happy TT!

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  5. That was a good one. I didn't know a couple of those...

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  6. Oh yes, I've encountered those abbreviations many times in books, in my work and even in blogging. That Lasagna is so delicious.
    Thanks for the visit.

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  7. I knew what #10 meant but I never knew what it was called.

    In older books they used to write &c instead of etc. One still comes across it occasionally. I sometimes write it that way if I am feeling especially Victorian!

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  8. That was fun - I laughed when I saw the I love NY one :) And, the food looks divine! Makes me wanna go cook! (thx for the visit - happy TT)

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  9. Thanks for visiting my TT.
    I enjoyed your list.

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  10. Most of these I new, but didn't know what zip stood for. Thanks for educating me. Have a great TT Hootin' Anni. :)

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  11. Good evening Anni, I knew a few of these on your list.I did not know what ZIP code stood for ? thanks for teaching us..I will post my TT in a minute. The recipe sounds great.. I need to try this for my family...

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  12. I enjoyed your list, and the lasagna sounds yummy.

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  13. Huh. Who knew? It's amazing that we've kept the abbreviations but not translated the words from Latin. Gosh language is almost as fascinating as people!

    Happy TT!

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  14. Very interesting and informative! The recipe sounds (and looks) delicious, too!

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  15. Forget the TT, that cucumber dish looks wonderful!

    SJR
    The Pink Flamingo
    http://thepinkflamingo.blogharbor.com/blog

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  16. Very helpful TT..thanks! And the recipe looks great!

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  17. It makes sense that lb would be related to libra, I'm a libra and have way too many lbs! LOL!

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  18. lol = laugh out loud ! That's what I am doing ! Your lasagne recepe is a little different from the original Italian one, but sounds very good ! If I would ask my SIL what Cheddar cheese is she would look at me with two question marks in her eyes !

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  19. Good Morning Anni,
    I hope you haven't been out in that frigid garage again this morning. LOL. "THANK YOU" for sharing the meaning of those little symbols. I knew some of them already, but there are some I didn't know. Where do you find all of this stuff you post about? You sure are one smart lady. Mmmmm, your Lasagna looks so good. Sounds easy to make as well. I may have to try it sometime. I don't think our girls likes Lasagna, but me and DH do. The cucumber salad looks devine as well. I love cucumbers, but they don't love me. I still eat them anyway. "THANK YOU" for sharing your recipe for Lasagna and Cucumber Salad. Take care my friend and have a great day. May God Bless You and Yours. Stay out of that frigid garage too. LOL. Just kidding with ya.

    Love & Hugs,
    Karen H.

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  20. Interesting!

    And the recipe sounds good.

    Happy TT!

    my 13

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  21. Hi Anni...Great info I knew what most of these meant but had no idea of the origin. Great list. Your lasagna sounds great and soooo easy! I never precook my noodles either..thanks for sharing the frig trick I bet that makes a huge difference in cooking time. I am making that cucumber salad for sure.Thanks!

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  22. Education and yummy food? It doesn't get any better than that!

    Thank you.

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  23. Hey..I didn't know wat ZIP means till now..thanks for sharing..

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  24. Thank you for posting such an interesting and informative TT. As a Brit, to me, a ZIP is something that holds my jeans up! We call them post codes, but ZIP is much easier to say. Happy TT!

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  25. I knew some of them - but learned about some I didn't!

    Happy TT-13!

    Smiles,

    Holly
    http://theabundanceplace.com

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  26. I love informative lists! Thanks for stopping by :)

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  27. Anni,

    You TT was interesting. Symbols are sometimes baffling and you have posted some good ones.

    Your lasagna and salad look delicious. I'll be by for dinner. LOL Just kidding. I am going to try your easy to make lasagna and serve it with your salad and some garlic toast. Maybe this weekend.

    Thanks so much for sharing.

    Blessings,
    Mary

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  28. That is an absolutely adorable header that you made. If you ever want to make a fairy one for me, you know I would love it, use it, and appreciate it.
    I am craving lasagna now, and your salad looks so yummy. We usually do a lettuce salad with lasagna....darn now I am craving hot bacon salad.
    Great list and recipe Anni.
    Peace, Love, and Mama Bear Hugs...pop into the Cafe, I am returning to an old fashioned blog of my personal voice.

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  29. Anni, didn't know what ZIP stood for; Loved the American flag emoticon. Thanks for sharing! :)

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  30. Forgot to comment on your great header...you're so talented! :)

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  31. Well now! You left me feeling ENTIRELY intelligent today! The only abbreviation I did NOT know was the emoticon for the flag!

    That lasagne sounds YUMMY! (though I DO like the ricotta...) I'll have to try this though! Do you use full fat cheese? Or the 2%? I always use the 2%... I wonder if it will work as well in this recipe?

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  32. Sounds yummy!
    I never had a recipe with ricotta cheese - we use Béchamel sauce - but I do love cottage cheese!
    hugs
    L

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  33. I love informative lists like this one, Anni! :)

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  34. Never heard of making lasagne with noodles before. Interesting!

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  35. happy tt!
    i always wondered what sic meant. great list. :)

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  36. I'm always interested in word origins and abbreviations. Although I had a general idea about what #1 meant, I liked your detailed explanation. I also didn't know about the abbrev. for 2 and 3.

    I had a sister-in-law who made the best lasagna. She was actually from Italy so I think that helped.

    Thanks for paying a visit to my TT.

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  37. Hi again Anni...Just wanted to let you know I made your Lasagna for dinner last night..oooohhhh so good! Saturday morning Sweetie is still saying how much he liked it. Putting it in the frig did make all the difference, Thanks! Btw, Love the Valentine look.

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  38. Very interesting list. I had never seen the American flag one. Thank you visiting my site. I am late getting responses to my Thursday Thirteen list. Our cable was out Thursday afternoon and evening. I enjoyed your recipes also. I am going to offer a contest soon centering on recipes. More info later.
    Blessings, Cricket

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