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Only 9 Months Old and Traveled the Continent!!!

After quite a 'disappointing' day birding yesterday, with the migrant warblers not cooperating with my camera lens, flitting and darting behind branches, becoming non-photographic most times, I was made happier once I got home!!!

I'll begin with this PDF certificate I received last night! I've been holding my breath for what seemed like an eternity, but only 3 weeks, if that long; hoping to receive information on a particular finding on the beach!! If you notice above, with the link to my bird blog---a particular bird, a photo of the Piping Plover was shared over the weekend by me. I didn't add one special photo, nor did I mention that this rare bird I photographed was actually BANDED. I sent the photo and the long/lat coordinates to USGS to report my sighting. Keeping my fingers crossed that they could find and send me the info as to where the bird was banded....Yesterday, I found out!!!
    Certificate Of Appreciation Awarded To: TEXAS ANNI (band#: 2651-14785 date: 04/05/2015) 
    BandReports@usgs.gov Apr 20 at 9:32 PM 
    To txanni[email info removed by me for privacy] 
     
    The North American Bird Banding Program Bird banding is important for studying the movement, survival and behavior of birds. About 60 million birds representing hundreds of species have been banded in North America since 1904. About 4 million bands have been recovered and reported. Data from banded birds are used in monitoring populations, setting hunting regulations, restoring endangered species, studying effects of environmental contaminants, and addressing such issues as Avian Influenza, bird hazards at airports, and crop depredations. Results from banding studies support national and international bird conservation programs such as Partners in Flight, the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, and Wetlands for the Americas. The North American Bird Banding Program is under the general direction of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Canadian Wildlife Service. Cooperators include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mexico's National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity and Secretary of the Environment and Natural Resources; other federal, state and provincial conservation agencies; universities; amateur ornithologists; bird observatories; nature centers; nongovernmental organizations such as Ducks Unlimited and the National Audubon Society; environmental consulting firms and other private sector businesses. However, the most important partner in this cooperative venture is you, the person who voluntarily reported a recovered band. Thank you for your help.
     U.S. Geological Survey Canadian Wildlife Service 
     Please Report Bands at www.reportband.gov or call 1-800-327-BAND 
     C_of_A_2651-14785_1844262
     Download / View



Perhaps you'd like to see the photo I DIDN'T SHARE? The one I used to send the information to USGS? You can see the banded leg under my logo [the LARGER photo]. But first, the photo I published at I'd Rather B Birdin' this past weekend: 


Okay, since you're beggin' for it....


....to think, this little booger, once not old enough to fly, took to wing from Montana, showing up on the Gulf Coast of Mexico, near Corpus Christi, Texas....a flight of approximately 1300 to 1500 miles [a mere nine months after banding], to say 'hi' to Hootin' Anni and wave goodbye as it flew off after the photo was taken!! Thrilling. I hope it survives a long time, finding a mate, having little ones and help restore its future existence. And now, I hope to see more banded birds as I walk the trails, birding!!!  

Piping Plover are on the 2014 State of the Birds Watch List, which lists species most in danger of extinction without significant conservation action. This species is listed as endangered in Canada and the inland United States, threatened along coast. Declines resulted from direct and unintentional harassment by people, dogs, and vehicles, destruction of beach habitat for development, and changes in water level regulation.

38 comments :

  1. Hi Anni, so happy you noticed the band on this cute Piping Plover.. It is so sad they are so in danger of being extinct.. Happy Tuesday!

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  2. Nice one Anni. This proves why banding (we call it ringing) of any species is a valuable source of information especially when the birds are subsequently found and records submitted. Similar schemes operate in Europe but reading the ring detail on distant birds can be very difficult. Great that you managed a helpful image to support your find.

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  3. A really good find of yours Anni. And great that you got the information back about the original ringing/banding. What a good idea of the scheme to send a certificate of appreciation.

    Over here finders of ringed birds get an explanatory letter and thanks but not a certificate like that.

    A lovely story. I hope it encourages others to report any ringed/banded birds they find.

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  4. A really good find of yours Anni. And great that you got the information back about the original ringing/banding. What a good idea of the scheme to send a certificate of appreciation.

    Over here finders of ringed birds get an explanatory letter and thanks but not a certificate like that.

    A lovely story. I hope it encourages others to report any ringed/banded birds they find.

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  5. How exciting Anni and yes what a thrill. Imagine all those miles on those strong little wings. Thanks so much for sharing this with us and I wish it a long happy life also.

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  6. That is so cool, Anni!

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  7. How interesting! I knew that people banded birds but didn't know that there was a way to find out where and when the bird was banded. That is really neat!

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  8. That is so cool! Glad you got such a good photo and heard back from them. I didn't know you could even get that info!

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  9. Anni, this is wonderful. I´m so glad you were able to read the band. And with such an unusual bird I believe everybody involved are happy :) Congratulations!

    Many years ago I found a dead gull with a band on. I sent it in and later received the info for the bird. If I remember right it was 6 years old and banded somewhere in Central Europe. :)

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  10. How exciting for you and interesting for us. I knew they banded birds but didn't really know anything about how it worked.

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  11. This is an all around winner! For the bird, for you, and for the USGS. Congratulations to all. Hoot!

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  12. Good job Anni...exciting for you I'm sure. I'm always fascinated by what people are passionate about, and this is yours. I'll be on the beach in Port A this weekend, watching the sand castle sculpture.

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  13. Congratulations on your find and the certificate, Anni!
    Now your "love me wall" must look really great! :))
    Are you going to hang it between the other bird pictures?
    Have a great day

    Tinna ✐

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  14. Anni, this is super special! You should be in the birders hall of fame. :) We do a lot of bird banding here and it is fascinating stuff. Your efforts in the birding community are so important. Keep up the great work!!

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  15. I had to forward this to one of my bird banding friends. He's going to be so impressed! WY to geaux, Anni!

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  16. Way...not WY. Stupid iPad.

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  17. That is so cool. I once found a dead carrier pigeon in my backyard with two colored tags and numbers on them. I called a few places here in Minnesota before I found the right place and they were happy to take my information, but that was the end of it. I put him nicely in a box if anyone wanted to verify it or bring it in, but apparently not! Never heard a word.

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  18. Oh superb stuff Anni!! Delighted for you. Always pays to send off those pictures for banding. Holds important information. It's a cracking picture too!

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  19. What a huge birding adventure! And to actually report a banding and get a reward for it, I am impressed! Not to mention your good pictures of the Plover!

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  20. Great find. shot and ceertificate.

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  21. Very, very exciting, Anni! What a great sighting, and so neat to get the certificate. Thanks for your comment on my blog and directing me to this post, too. Good to see!

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  22. Oh I am so proud of you! What a grand sighting. I never did understand so much about how the banding program worked before (the tracking part of it). Amazing. That cute little bird packed a lot of miles into a short time . I am in awe of your find!

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  23. Oh how cool! Lovely looking bird.

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  24. How exciting. Great post!

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  25. Congratulations! How very exciting and what a long journey that young bird has made.

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  26. Thank you Anni for the prompt. I was thinking that I had seen this sweet one and commented already, but possibly on another meme you shared it on. I think this is so remarkable and that you my friend would get to view it, even for a quick minute to get this/these wonderful captures. You were right ready I would say and congratulations, it just has to have been so gratifying. More hugs coming your way~

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  27. Oh, how wonderful and exciting indeed!! Such a handsome little fellow!! Terrific captures as always, Anni!! Thanks for sharing! Sounds as though you week is off to a great start!

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  28. That is so exciting! It reminds me of my neighbor in New Mexico who bands hummingbirds. Very few of them were ever recovered away from her own feeders. Yet one showed up in British Columbia and actually nested in the yard of the banker who trapped it! She actually visited from Canada and brought the hummer's nest with her (a big no-no and illegal, by the way) but it was truly an exciting event, it was. Rufous Hummingbird. So far I have been able to eat enough of the bands of three bird said-- a cormorant and a Sandhills Crane in Illinois and a Red Knot on Florida's Gulf Coast. It is so interesting to learn of their origins the knot was banded in New Jersey 5 years previously, the oldest one of the three. I blogged about all of them hoping that others will be aware of the importance of banding research.

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    1. oops-- I guess the iPhone "corrected" my spelling in a few places. The text is so small that proofing is difficult! I usually don't "eat" bird bands, though I don't know what the iPhone wanted me to say!

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  29. Superb Anni! Well Done!!!

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  30. Excellent catch, Anni!! Congratulations!!

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  31. I have never heard any of this about the banded birds and that they can and should be reported ... that is amazing he flew that far and no telling where he is now.. fantastic for you and for other birders.

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  32. well that is very cool. Silly question but how were they able to determine the band number. Was that visible in your picture and clear enough to read it?

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  33. That is just wonderful ...

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  34. Congrats on an awesome sighting! It's always interesting to find out more about the birds you see.

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  35. Oh wow! That is so very cool. What a great catch! Congratulations! Michelle

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